Suzanna. In love with a schnauzer named Mimzy. Instagram
animalworld:

WESTERN SPOTTED SKUNK Spilogale gracilis©AP Photo/WCS, Julie Larsen Maher
By Request: Can SKUNKS Climb Trees?Interesting question. To be honest, I’d never thought about it and I didn’t know the answer - which is, some can. Striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) which I’m much more familiar with, having had a family living under our deck for a season — don’t  normally climb anything, instead they tend to shuffle around fearlessly. I guess when you smell the worst, you get to call the shots. I will say this, they were  surprisingly playful with our kittens and facinating to watch. To answer the question though, their smaller cousins the Western and Eastern Spotted Skunks are faster and more agile than other skunks and Spotted Skunks  can climb trees with surprising ease. Who knew?!
—-
The Western Spotted Skunk (Spilogale gracilis) is found throughout the western United States, northern Mexico, and southwestern British Columbia. With a total length of 35–55 centimetres (14–22 in), the Western Spotted Skunk is about half the size of the Striped Skunk or a house cat.
Skunks are opportunistic foragers that will eat nearly anything that they can find or catch. Their habitat is mixed woodlands, open areas, and farmlands. To scare predators they stand on their front legs, raise their hind legs in the air and spray directly over their heads—with amazing accuracy.
All skunks are capable of delayed implantation - - meaning that after mating the fertilized egg can be held dormant in the female’s body for many weeks before they are implanted in the uterine wall and development continued. For this reason, mating of the Western Spotted Skunk often occurs in the fall with implantation delayed until spring.
Fact Source: http://eduscapes.com/nature/skunk/index1.htm
A good Western Spotted Skunk story: http://songdogchronicles.com/category/adventure/
Other photos that you may like:
Baby Striped Skunks
Raccoon
Baby Opossum

SW BC!? that’s where I live! I want to see a teeny tree-climbing skunk!

animalworld:

WESTERN SPOTTED SKUNK
Spilogale gracilis
©AP Photo/WCS, Julie Larsen Maher

By Request: Can SKUNKS Climb Trees?
Interesting question. To be honest, I’d never thought about it and I didn’t know the answer - which is, some can. Striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) which I’m much more familiar with, having had a family living under our deck for a season — don’t normally climb anything, instead they tend to shuffle around fearlessly. I guess when you smell the worst, you get to call the shots. I will say this, they were surprisingly playful with our kittens and facinating to watch. To answer the question though, their smaller cousins the Western and Eastern Spotted Skunks are faster and more agile than other skunks and Spotted Skunks can climb trees with surprising ease. Who knew?!

—-

The Western Spotted Skunk (Spilogale gracilis) is found throughout the western United States, northern Mexico, and southwestern British Columbia. With a total length of 35–55 centimetres (14–22 in), the Western Spotted Skunk is about half the size of the Striped Skunk or a house cat.

Skunks are opportunistic foragers that will eat nearly anything that they can find or catch. Their habitat is mixed woodlands, open areas, and farmlands. To scare predators they stand on their front legs, raise their hind legs in the air and spray directly over their heads—with amazing accuracy.

All skunks are capable of delayed implantation - - meaning that after mating the fertilized egg can be held dormant in the female’s body for many weeks before they are implanted in the uterine wall and development continued. For this reason, mating of the Western Spotted Skunk often occurs in the fall with implantation delayed until spring.

Fact Source: http://eduscapes.com/nature/skunk/index1.htm

A good Western Spotted Skunk story:
http://songdogchronicles.com/category/adventure/

Other photos that you may like:

Baby Striped Skunks

Raccoon

Baby Opossum

SW BC!? that’s where I live! I want to see a teeny tree-climbing skunk!

traveling-the-world:

Auster-Skaftafellssysla, Iceland
By peace-on-earth.org

traveling-the-world:

Auster-Skaftafellssysla, Iceland

By peace-on-earth.org

(via daylightsouvenirs)

#iceland   #travel   #europe   #nature   #landscape  

(via )

#cat   #animals   #kitty   #big cat   #tiger  
The great enemy of the truth is very often not the lie — deliberate, contrived and dishonest, but the myth, persistent, persuasive, and unrealistic. Belief in myths allows the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought.
John F Kennedy (via pandacake)

(Source: atheismfuckyeah, via pandacake)

#quote   #john f kennedy   #jfk  
my camera; except I have a better lens

my camera; except I have a better lens

(via )

#camera   #photography   #canon  
laureola:

3 Baby Squirrels - Kennerdell (by visitPA)

our baby squirrels nested in our house…

laureola:

3 Baby Squirrels - Kennerdell (by visitPA)

our baby squirrels nested in our house…

(via )

#squirrels   #baby animals   #animals   #tree  
Kindness is a language which the deaf can hear and the blind can see.
Mark Twain (via kari-shma)

(Source: kari-shma, via quote-book)

#quote   #mark twain  

"The house-elves of Hogwarts swarmed into the Entrance Hall, screaming and waving carving knives and cleavers, and at their head, the locket of Regulus Black bouncing on his chest, was Kreacher, his bullfrog’s voice audible even above this din: ‘Fight! Fight! Fight for my master, defender of house-elves! Fight the Dark Lord, in the name of brave Regulus! Fight!’"

I’ll be chuffed if the ax that from the film.

Also, Mrs Weasley shouts “NOT MY DAUGHTER, YOU BITCH!” in the film, right?

Saturn Storm

Saturn Storm

#saturn   #planet   #storm   #solar system   #false colour   #weater   #science   #astronomy   #nasa  
Earth at night. Satellite image of the  artificial light on Earth at night. The most urbanized areas are North  America (upper left), Europe (upper centre) and Japan (upper right). The  darkest areas include parts of Africa (centre), South America (lower  left), Asia (upper right) and the oceans (blue). The orange band across  Africa shows the light from agricultural fires. The white area at upper  left is the aurora borealis, (northern lights) in the atmosphere above  the Arctic Circle. These occur naturally as a result of the ionisation  of molecules in the atmosphere, at low temperatures, by solar and cosmic  radiation.

Earth at night. Satellite image of the artificial light on Earth at night. The most urbanized areas are North America (upper left), Europe (upper centre) and Japan (upper right). The darkest areas include parts of Africa (centre), South America (lower left), Asia (upper right) and the oceans (blue). The orange band across Africa shows the light from agricultural fires. The white area at upper left is the aurora borealis, (northern lights) in the atmosphere above the Arctic Circle. These occur naturally as a result of the ionisation of molecules in the atmosphere, at low temperatures, by solar and cosmic radiation.

#earth   #satellite   #night   #lights   #fires   #aurora borealis   #science   #astronmy  
scipsy:

A sunrise and the first glimmer of daylight peek above the Earth’s horizon. (via CSA)

scipsy:

A sunrise and the first glimmer of daylight peek above the Earth’s horizon. (via CSA)

(via whisperingwillow-deactivated201)

#sunrise   #earth   #astronomy   #horizon  
teremtettvilag:

Black bear cubs. Cade’s Cove, Smoky Mountain National Park, Tennessee, USA.

teremtettvilag:

Black bear cubs. Cade’s Cove, Smoky Mountain National Park, Tennessee, USA.

(via )

#bear   #black bear   #animals   #baby animals   #cubs  
The first step to confronting advertising is to stop seeing it as a form of commercialized communication and start considering it to be a kind of pollution.
Toxic Culture Micah M. White , 20 Jun 2011 (via pandacake)

(Source: veganismandstuff, via pandacake)

#quote   #book   #excerpt   #toxic culture  

A line down the insect’s middle marks the division between its male side and its more colourful female side.

Failure of the butterfly’s sex chromosomes to separate during fertilisation is behind this rare sexual chimera.

Once it has lived out its month-long life, the butterfly will join the museum’s collection.

Only 0.01% of hatching butterflies are gynandromorphs; the technical term for these strange asymmetrical creatures.

Link Post
fyearth:

SAATCHI ARTIST CLOSE-UP: J HENRY FAIR
Bauxite waste from aluminum production. By J Henry Fair Photograph, 75 x 50 in
Buy Original Artwork At Saatchi Online: $6,000
SO: What are you currently working on that we can watch out for in the future?JHF: There are always new projects within Industrial Scars to be explored, often in conjunction with any environmental law that is under attack, or an issue that demands attention. In different realms, I’m doing a series on the south, mostly people, with a sort of Tennessee Williams look at the normal/bizarre. Also the concept of brand and logo interest me, so I’m doing a series of images depicting their effect on daily life… Read More >

fyearth:

SAATCHI ARTIST CLOSE-UP: J HENRY FAIR

Bauxite waste from aluminum production.
By J Henry Fair
Photograph, 75 x 50 in

Buy Original Artwork At Saatchi Online: $6,000

SO: What are you currently working on that we can watch out for in the future?

JHF: There are always new projects within Industrial Scars to be explored, often in conjunction with any environmental law that is under attack, or an issue that demands attention. In different realms, I’m doing a series on the south, mostly people, with a sort of Tennessee Williams look at the normal/bizarre. Also the concept of brand and logo interest me, so I’m doing a series of images depicting their effect on daily life… Read More >

(Source: saatchiart)

llbwwb:

Sandwich of an Elephant and a Zebra 109_0939_RJ (by WildImages)

peek-a-boo

llbwwb:

Sandwich of an Elephant and a Zebra 109_0939_RJ (by WildImages)

peek-a-boo

(via )

#elephant   #zebra   #animals  

Criteria:

  • Long (at least 500 pages), but preferably available in paperback so it’s not too heavy.
  • Engaging enough that I want to continue to read it, but not enthralling the way Harry Potter is so I have to read it in one sitting and then run out of book for the rest of my trip.
  • Preferably fiction so I don’t feel the urge to take notes. Historical fiction is my favourite. Also, some science fiction. Ideally nothing that will make me cry because crying on planes hurts my face.
  • Trilogies and series are fine, but only if I can find them in single book form.

Any suggestions? Please let there be suggestions.

#books   #help!  
I no longer believed in the idea of soul mates, or love at first sight. But I was beginning to believe that a very few times in your life, if you were lucky, you might meet someone who was exactly right for you. Not because he was perfect, or because you were, but because your combined flaws were arranged in a way that allowed two separate beings to hinge together.
Lisa Kleypas (via tror)

(Source: vagtull, via quote-book)

#quote   #lisa kleypas  
khrisjuhlin replied to your post: I need a book to read on my trip
Have you read “The pillars of the earth” by Ken Follet? The first of two books (the second is “World without end”). Amazingly written, very historical, in England. But… a bit like Harry Potter, and could make you cry… you have to read it though!

Yes, I have and I love them. If I hadn’t just reread them both in the last few months they may have been an option. But I read both in a week so maybe not :P also read his new WWI novel, Fall of Giants. Have you read it? it’s great too :)

Text Post
cornersoftheworld:

Chemerong Waterfall

aren’t orchids sexy?

cornersoftheworld:

Chemerong Waterfall

aren’t orchids sexy?

(Source: cornersoftheworld)

#orchid   #flowers   #nature   #plant   #scenery   #waterfall  
llbwwb:

Backlit Greater Sandhill Cranes in steamy canal  (by WildImages)

llbwwb:

Backlit Greater Sandhill Cranes in steamy canal (by WildImages)

(via )

#cranes   #birds   #animals   #sunlight  

Now I’m all sweaty.

Also had a stress dream about working at Staples. I haven’t worked there in two years.

This means I’m probably going to have to reapply. I need a job that bad.

#boo-urns  

Text Post

no pants dance

I hate pants

(Source: thingsstonerslike)

A thought, even a possibility, can shatter and transform us.
Friedrich Nietzsche (via girlwithoutwings)

(Source: quote-book)

nationalgeographicmagazine:

Elephant, South Africa Photograph by Eric LanglayI took this photo on a job in South Africa, in Kruger National Park. This particular elephant is Jabulani, which is featured on Amarula bottles. It was after an elephant safari through the African bush.
Download Wallpaper (1600 x 1200 pixels)

nationalgeographicmagazine:

Elephant, South Africa
Photograph by Eric Langlay
I took this photo on a job in South Africa, in Kruger National Park. This particular elephant is Jabulani, which is featured on Amarula bottles. It was after an elephant safari through the African bush.

Download Wallpaper (1600 x 1200 pixels)

kitties ears taste nummy

kitties ears taste nummy

(via whisperingwillow-deactivated201)

#animals   #cut   #puppy   #kitten  

aljazeera:

People celebrate birth after voting for independence in a referendum under a peace deal that ended decades of war.

#sudan   #south sudan   #africa   #nation   #politics   #al jazeera   #news   #history  

caraobrien:

…Despite significant reductions in extreme poverty, the world will find it difficult to eradicate hunger, however, which is another target of MDG 1. The persistence of hunger is forcing policymakers to address problems such as access to food and high food prices. The Food and Agriculture Organisation has been asked to undertake a comprehensive review to see what policies could lead to a reduction in the proportion of people going hungry, which has plateaued at 16%.

Sub-Saharan Africa chalked up the best record for improvement in primary school enrolment, but the world is far from achieving universal primary education, MDG 2. Burundi, Madagascar, Rwanda, Samoa, São Tomé and Principe, Togo and Tanzania are among the countries that have achieved, or are nearing the goal of universal primary education. The abolition of school fees has contributed to progress in many of these countries, the UN said.

To achieve universal primary education, children must complete a full cycle of primary schooling. Currently, 87 out of 100 children in poor countries complete primary education.

On gender equality and the empowerment of women, the report said girls are gaining ground in education, though unequal access persists in many regions. Some 96 girls were enrolled in primary and secondary schools for every 100 boys in 2009, a significant improvement since 1999, when the ratios were 91 and 88, respectively. However, only three regions – the Caucasus and central Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean, and south-east Asia – have achieved gender parity in primary education. Exceptionally, in eastern Asia, girls slightly outnumber boys in primary school.

Aid, which comes under MDG 8, reached $128.7bn last year, a record high, but this was still $19bn short of the commitments made at the Gleneagles summit in 2005. Africa is shortchanged as the UN says preliminary estimates show it will receive only $11bn out of the $25bn increase promised at Gleneagles “due mainly to the underperformance of some European donors”.

Although gains have been made across the board, including a reduction in child mortality, a decline in new HIV infections and improved access to drinking water, the UN urged countries to target those hardest to reach – the poorest of the poor and those disadvantaged because of their sex, age, ethnicity or a disability. It said the gap between urban and rural areas remains daunting.

“We have success stories to point to,” the UN secretary-general, Ban Ki-moon, said in Geneva. “But achieving all the MDGs will require extra effort. Even where we have seen rapid growth, as in east Asia and other parts of the developing world, progress is not universal, nor are the benefits evenly shared. Stubbornly high unemployment persists in rich and poor countries alike. And in many cases, the wealth gap is widening – between the prosperous and the marginalised, between urban and rural. Solid gains in school enrolment and gender parity hardly signal mission accomplished.”

Read more…

#poverty   #hungry   #malnutrition   #humanitarianism   #food   #food prices  
lady-lutra:

I kinda wanna get a nudibranch tattooed on my foot. They’re my favourite of all sea creatures. Except maybe crabs. I do like crabs.
If I ever manage to qualify then I’ll get it done :) Maybe have a marine foot to go along with my flowery leg. I’m sad I’m too much of a wuss to dive off the British coast.

DO IT!!!!!

lady-lutra:

I kinda wanna get a nudibranch tattooed on my foot. They’re my favourite of all sea creatures. Except maybe crabs. I do like crabs.

If I ever manage to qualify then I’ll get it done :) Maybe have a marine foot to go along with my flowery leg. I’m sad I’m too much of a wuss to dive off the British coast.

DO IT!!!!!

#nudibranch   #animals   #sea creature   #tattoo  

caraobrien:

DADAAB, Kenya (AP) — The head of the U.N. refugee agency said Sunday that drought-riddenSomalia is the “worst humanitarian disaster” in the world after meeting with refugees who endured unspeakable hardship to reach the world’s largest refugee camp.

The Kenyan camp, Dadaab, is overflowing with tens of thousands of newly arrived refugees forced into the camp by the parched landscape in the region where Somalia, Ethiopia and Kenya meet. The World Food Program estimates that 10 million people already need humanitarian aid. The U.N. Children’s Fund estimates that more than 2 million children are malnourished and in need of lifesaving action.

Antonio Guterra, the head of UNHCR who visited Dadaab on Sunday, appealed to the world to supply the “massive support” needed by thousands of refugees showing up at this camp every week. More than 380,000 refugees now live there.

In Dadaab, Guterra spoke with a Somalia mother who lost three of her children during a 35-day walk to reach the camp. Guterra said Dadaab holds “the poorest of the poor and the most vulnerable of the vulnerable.”

“I became a bit insane after I lost them,” said the mother, Muslima Aden. “I lost them in different times on my way.”

Guterra is on a tour of the region to highlight the dire need. On Thursday he was in the Ethiopian camp of Dollo Ado, a camp that is also overflowing.

“The mortality rates we are witnessing are three times the level of emergency ceilings,” he said. “The level of malnutrition of the children coming in is 50 percent. That is enough to explain why a very high level of mortality is inevitable,” he said.

Dr. Dejene Kebede, a health officer for UNHCR, said there were 58 deaths in camps in one week alone in June.

Read more…

You can donate to the UNHCR Somali Emergency fund here.

#somalia   #drought   #humanitarian   #africa   #horn of africa   #food   #water  
There’s also no sign of civilization or even intelligent life.

There’s also no sign of civilization or even intelligent life.

(via beautefantasy)

#earth  
jtotheizzoe:

One year ago, we discovered Neptune.
One Neptunian year, that is. See, it takes Neptune 164.79 years to go around the Sun, and it’s been that long since it was discovered - on September 23, 1846.
(via The Observer)

jtotheizzoe:

One year ago, we discovered Neptune.

One Neptunian year, that is. See, it takes Neptune 164.79 years to go around the Sun, and it’s been that long since it was discovered - on September 23, 1846.

(via The Observer)

(via jtotheizzoe)

#neptule   #planet   #astronomy   #science   #birthday   #solary system  
  1. superchloe said: A Fine Balance by Rohinton Mistry. I admittedly have not actually read this book though. I’m recommending it because I’m going to start reading it this week (once I finish up the last Harry Potter) and I’ve been recommended it before I go to India… block

requested, thanks :D

  1. njwight said: Shadow of the Wind block

requested, as is it’s prequel

  1. paleontologue said: Tristes Tropiques by Claude Levi-Strauss is really nice. It’s his memoir as an anthropologist and some of his philosophical reflections on geology, his travel, religion, etc. or Every Since Darwin By Steven Jay Gould is quite the read as well. :) block

both on my list but I know I’ll want to take notes so in my book queue but not for this trip

  1. khrisjuhlin said: Have you read “The pillars of the earth” by Ken Follet? The first of two books (the second is “World without end”). Amazingly written, very historical, in England. But… a bit like Harry Potter, and could make you cry… you have to read it though! block

yup but I’ll read them too fast :P

  1. blindingsmiles said: Kissed by an Angel by Elizabeth Chandler. I’m not sure how long it is, but it’s interesting enough, sad. All that. It is a series, but it’s available in a single book form at Barnes & Noble in paperback.

not really my style but requested anyway cuz it’s good and long :P

thanks everyone!

Text Post

(Source: life-is-be-au-tiful, via )

#animals   #sunset   #shark?   #whale?  
fyeahderrickjensen:

Photo from Greenpeace Russia (via)

Clearcutting destroys [the] complexity [of a forest], replacing it with bare ground. Even if replanting succeeds, and often it doesn’t, the result is a single-age, single-height, often single-species plantation.Another problem with clearcutting is that with the overstory gone, snow falls on bare ground. Normally when snow falls on a forest, some stays on trees, some settles on the ground below. When spring rains fall on this forest, the drops are caught and cushioned by the snow still on the trees. Chilled water drips slowly to the forest floor, if it even makes it this far before freezing again. Water from the snow on the ground that does melt is absorbed in duff, loose soil, and dead trees, and then released slowly, over time, to make its way eventually to streams and rivers, or down into the aquifer. After deforestation, rain falls on snow covering bare ground, quickly melting the snow, which runs off in sheets, carrying soil with it. This can cause one-hundred-year floods—floods that should happen only once a century—to become annual or even semi-annual events. In the language of foresters, this is called a ‘rain-on-snow event.’ In the language of the rest of us, this is called a disaster.

— Derrick Jensen and George Draffan in Strangely Like War: The Global Assault on Forests (2003), p. 33

fyeahderrickjensen:

Photo from Greenpeace Russia (via)

Clearcutting destroys [the] complexity [of a forest], replacing it with bare ground. Even if replanting succeeds, and often it doesn’t, the result is a single-age, single-height, often single-species plantation.

Another problem with clearcutting is that with the overstory gone, snow falls on bare ground. Normally when snow falls on a forest, some stays on trees, some settles on the ground below. When spring rains fall on this forest, the drops are caught and cushioned by the snow still on the trees. Chilled water drips slowly to the forest floor, if it even makes it this far before freezing again. Water from the snow on the ground that does melt is absorbed in duff, loose soil, and dead trees, and then released slowly, over time, to make its way eventually to streams and rivers, or down into the aquifer. After deforestation, rain falls on snow covering bare ground, quickly melting the snow, which runs off in sheets, carrying soil with it. This can cause one-hundred-year floods—floods that should happen only once a century—to become annual or even semi-annual events. In the language of foresters, this is called a ‘rain-on-snow event.’ In the language of the rest of us, this is called a disaster.

— Derrick Jensen and George Draffan in Strangely Like War: The Global Assault on Forests (2003), p. 33

(via therecipe)