Suzanna. In love with a schnauzer named Mimzy. Instagram

fotojournalismus:

Ethiopia’s Ancient Salt Trails

(via Reuters)

“Photographer Siegfried Modola traveled to document Ethiopia’s ancient salt trade in the Danakil Depression, one of the hottest and harshest environments on earth, with an average annual temperature of 94 degrees Fahrenheit (34.4 Celsius). For centuries, merchants have traveled there with caravans of camels to collect salt from the surface of the vast desert basin. The mineral is extracted and shaped into slabs, then loaded onto the animals before being transported back across the desert so that it can be sold around the country.

Read Siegfried’s personal account here.”

#ethiopia   #salt flats   #salt   #resources   #nature   #travel   #trade   #economy   #africa   #salt trails   #reuters   #siegfried modola   #photography   #queue  

The End of Oil van Edward Burtynsky

(Source: catrinastewart, via onearth)

climateadaptation:

More tangible examples of climate impacts.
laboratoryequipment:

Western Fires Kill Thousands of CattleAcross the West, major wildfires are wreaking havoc this summer on the region’s economically fragile livestock industry. In areas such as remote Powder River County, Mont., ranchers says they could be grappling with the devastation for years to come.Hay is in short supply. Hundreds of miles of fence and numerous corrals and water tanks must be rebuilt. Thousands of head of displaced livestock are being shipped to temporary pastures. Similar scenes are playing out in Oregon, New Mexico, Colorado, Wyoming and Idaho. Including Montana, the value of the six states’ cattle industries approaches $9 billion annually.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news-Western-Fires-Kill-Hundreds-of-Cattle-072712.aspx

climateadaptation:

More tangible examples of climate impacts.

laboratoryequipment:

Western Fires Kill Thousands of Cattle

Across the West, major wildfires are wreaking havoc this summer on the region’s economically fragile livestock industry. In areas such as remote Powder River County, Mont., ranchers says they could be grappling with the devastation for years to come.

Hay is in short supply. Hundreds of miles of fence and numerous corrals and water tanks must be rebuilt. Thousands of head of displaced livestock are being shipped to temporary pastures. Similar scenes are playing out in Oregon, New Mexico, Colorado, Wyoming and Idaho. Including Montana, the value of the six states’ cattle industries approaches $9 billion annually.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news-Western-Fires-Kill-Hundreds-of-Cattle-072712.aspx

#wildfire   #drought   #cattle   #cows   #economy   #summer 2012   #climate change   #ranchers   #farming   #agriculture   #livestock   #animals  
climateadaptation:

Expect food prices to go up at the end of the summer. But, are there long term impacts from this year’s droughts??
theweekmagazine:

The National Climatic Data Center said this week that more than half of the U.S. spent June in a moderate or extreme drought, the widest incidence of drought in half a century. Some numbers to put things into perspective:
26 — States that have been declared natural disaster areas due to the weather this summer
3,215 — Daily U.S. heat records broken in June
46 — Days without rain in Indianapolis, In., from June 1 through July 16, breaking a record set in 1908
38 — Percent of U.S. corn crops in poor or very poor shape, according to the USDA
More numbers

climateadaptation:

Expect food prices to go up at the end of the summer. But, are there long term impacts from this year’s droughts??

theweekmagazine:

The National Climatic Data Center said this week that more than half of the U.S. spent June in a moderate or extreme drought, the widest incidence of drought in half a century. Some numbers to put things into perspective:

26 — States that have been declared natural disaster areas due to the weather this summer

3,215 — Daily U.S. heat records broken in June

46 — Days without rain in Indianapolis, In., from June 1 through July 16, breaking a record set in 1908

38 — Percent of U.S. corn crops in poor or very poor shape, according to the USDA

More numbers

ecocides:

Uncanny. 

(via rorschachx)

#apple   #mac   #economy   #computer   #capitalism   #consumerism   #space odyssey 2001  
Farewell to the Canadian penny
The last one-cent coin, in circulation since 1858, was minted on May 4th. The coin had become a nuisance, weighing down consumers’ wallets and costing more to produce than it was worth. (via theeconomist)

(via silveriodide)

#economy   #the economist   #penny   #money   #canada   #queue  
fotojournalismus:

A worker sorted chilies near Ahmedabad, India, Wednesday, Feb. 15.
[Credit : Ajit Solanki/Associated Press]

ouch

fotojournalismus:

A worker sorted chilies near Ahmedabad, India, Wednesday, Feb. 15.

[Credit : Ajit Solanki/Associated Press]

ouch

#india   #travel   #economy   #chili pepper   #queue  
cartoonpolitics:

references news that 1 in 2 new graduates will be either unemployed or underemployed

cartoonpolitics:

references news that 1 in 2 new graduates will be either unemployed or underemployed

(via brooklynmutt)

#education   #economy   #jobs   #queue   #comic  
Somehow, firing people with jobs became the Republican strategy for job creation. People who taught our children; policed our streets; picked up our garbage; put out our fires; built and maintained our parks, libraries, and roads for a living wage became the scapegoat for the impoverishment the private sector imposed on workers. Instead of organizing to win back their own living wages and lost benefits, people were convinced that taking away those of government workers would somehow make them better off. Divide and conquer politics. The politics of fear, hate, greed, envy and spite. The race to the bottom. Orchestrated by plutocrats, executed by conservatives, allowed by Democrats.
#quote   #queue   #john atcheson   #gop   #politics   #economy  

bannockandbutter:

 Indigenous Resistance to the enbridge northern gateway pipeline. Pictured:

  • “No Pipeline: Enbridge Dirty Oil Burned the Last Bridge”- Art by Gord Hill (Kwakwaka’wakw). From Hill’s Warrior Publications site. 
  • Nuxalk House of Smayusta banner at Bella Coola, central coast of BC. 
  • Yinka Dene protest proposed Enbridge pipeline, April 2011.
  • Hundreds rally in Comox against proposed Enbridge pipeline and increased tanker traffic on the coast, March 31, 2012.  
  • Heiltsuk hereditary chiefs greet government officials conducting Enbridge hearings in Bella Bella, April 1, 2012.  

Take action! Upcoming events:

May 1-9

Yinka Dene Alliance Freedom Train. The Yinka Dene Alliance is taking a Freedom Train across Canada to enforce their legal ban on the Enbridge Northern Gateway oil pipelines and tankers project, and to stand up for their freedom to choose their own future. They are travelling from their territories in northern BC all the way to Enbridge’s annual shareholders meeting in Toronto.

May 5, 2012

International Stop the Tar Sands Day. Worldwide events listed here.

Climate Impacts Day.  Find an event happening near your community with 350.org’s map tool. 

Global Indigenous Conference 2012 at the UBC First Nations Longhouse. I am on the planning committee, check it out!

More resources:

http://www.ienearth.org/tarsands.html

http://pipeupagainstenbridge.ca/

http://dogwoodinitiative.org/no-tankers/petition

http://www.pacificwild.org/site/our-work/no-tankers-no-pipeline.html

(via ratsandcandy666)

#pipeline   #oil   #economy   #politics   #first nations   #indigenous peoples   #protest  
good:

How Oliberte, the Anti-TOMS, Makes Shoes and Jobs in Africa
Canadian Tal Dehtiar founded  Oliberté Footwear, the first company to make premium shoes in Africa using African materials and explicitly linking shoes sold by Western retailers to job creation on the continent.
Read more onGOOD→ 

good:

How Oliberte, the Anti-TOMS, Makes Shoes and Jobs in Africa

Canadian Tal Dehtiar founded  Oliberté Footwear, the first company to make premium shoes in Africa using African materials and explicitly linking shoes sold by Western retailers to job creation on the continent.

Read more onGOOD 


#company   #shoes   #business   #africa   #jobs   #wealth   #economy   #queue  

noellejt:

Thank you for asking!

  • The demand for palm oil is going to make orangutans extinct. And very, very soon.

Orangutans are highly endangered.

In 1900, there were (give or take) 300,000 wild orangutans. A conservative estimate in 2003 numbers them at 50,000.

In just the last decade, the population has dropped by 50% - during the same time, the land used for palm oil plantations has doubled.

Orangutans have lost 90% of their habitat and the wild populations that are left are cut off from each other, left in genetic and reproductive isolation.

Orangutans live in only two places: Borneo (Indonesia and Malaysia) and Sumatra (Indonesia). Borneo has lost 50% of its rainforest and Sumatra has lost more than 70%. Orangutan habitat in Sumatra is less than 6% of the original forest.

Climate change has contributed to the loss of orangutan habitat - but, by far, the main culprit is loss of environment from recent human activity. Rainforest clearing (occasionally for human settlement, sometimes for logging, but primarily for for palm oil plantations) is accelerating at a dramatic rate. At least 87% of the rainforest clearing in Malaysia since 1985 was for palm oil plantations. In Indonesia, there were approximately 4 million hectares of palm oil plantation in 2002 - and the government intends to increase that to 11 million hectares by 2020.

If the current rate of palm oil industry expansion continues, orangutans will be extinct within the next decade - if not sooner.

  • Palm oil is bad for the environment.

Rainforests are cleared for palm oil plantations by burning everything down - including the peat bog below.

Not only are massive amounts of carbon released (each year, burning in Indonesia releases more carbon emission than all activity in India and Russia combined), but animals (and people) are killed in the fires the fires that grow out of control. (One fire in 1997 killed one third of the orangutans in Borneo.)

While 70% of palm oil is currently used in food (and a lot in cosmetics and household goods), there’s a growing push to use it as an alternative fuel. Sadly, once you take the peat bogs into account, it’s actually worse for the environment than fossil fuels.

  • Palm oil is bad for farmers, bad for the land,  and bad for the economy.

Rainforests have incredibly high levels of biodiversity. Palm oil plantations have incredibly low biodiversity. (Indonesia, although it’s only 1.3% of the earth’s surface, is home to 11% of the world’s plant species, 10% of its mammal species, and 16% of its bird species.)

Biodiversity isn’t just the animals that call the forest home, but the number of plant species - and the nutrients in the soil.

Burning down the forest adds nutrients to the soil - growing palm oil trees in the land soaks the nutrients back up, depleting the soil and making it useless. Farmers have to move on to fresh soil every few years. If the patch is in the middle of the rainforest, it can be naturally reclaimed within a few decades (and re-filled with nutrients) - but, as more and more land is cleared, that becomes less likely. The cleared land is less fertile - now useless.

While the palm oil plantations may be able to sit on useless land, small farmers can’t afford to - yet, they are clearing their land of edible crops and planting palm oil in record numbers - only to starve after a few years.

Share-cropping programs, which lend money to farmers to buy supplies to begin growing palm oil trees - which do not bear fruit for 7 years. The high start up costs and the chemicals and fertilizer mean that farmers rarely manage to earn back enough money to pay the debt and are left in worse poverty than they began.

Palm oil has come to monopolize the industry and infrastructure in Indonesia and Malaysia - a highly precarious economic situation, particularly as they abandon other agricultural crops and the ability to feed their own citizens.

  • Palm oil is bad for the local communities.

Plantations are notorious for poor working conditions: chemicals, children, and long hours. Immigrants from other countries are brought in to work (often illegally, sometimes by force).

Human rights abuses aren’t restricted to the plantations, either.

“Plantations are often forcibly established on land traditionally owned by indigenous peoples, and plantation development has repeatedly been associated with violent
conflict.”

In Indonesia, between 1998 and 2002 alone, nearly 500 were reported as having been tortured in community land conflicts and dozens killed. (An estimated 5 million more indigenous people will be evicted from their land by 2010 in West Kalimantan.)

  • Palm oil is bad for you.

Forget the geo-political and environmental repercussions - here’s a reason that might actually manage to get Westerners to boycott palm oil: It makes you fat.

Palm oil is a highly saturated fat - unlike most vegetable oils.

Saturated fats are bad for you: they increase cholesterol, are a leading cause of cardiovascular disease, and contribute to Type 2 diabetes.

While some saturated fat is necessary in the diet, palm oil isn’t being used to replace traditional saturated fats (from meat and dairy) - it’s being used in lieu of traditional vegetable oils, which are generally unsaturated (and healthier) than palm oil.

(via galdikas-deactivated20121116)

#palm oil   #industry   #agriculture   #endangered species   #orangutans   #queue   #indonesia   #environment   #sustainability   #resources   #fat   #health   #economy   #farming