Suzanna. In love with a schnauzer named Mimzy. Instagram

findchaos:

ChaosLife: Nature is Magical 2

Because nature is an endless source of inspiration.

By A. Stiffler [comics | facebook | twitter]

(via thefrogman)

#nature is magical   #nature   #animals   #lol   #comic   #cartoon   #facts   #queue  

scissorflags:

ultraheartcombo:

composite post: the About Ducks comic

facts

you saw it on the internet so you know it’s true

(via gisellley)

#ducks   #comic   #facts   #lol   #queue  
sagansense:


10 Things we want to know about Jupiter
Jupiter, the largest planet of our solar system is the fifth planet after the Sun, and lies between the planets, Mars and Saturn. It is also the fourth brightest object in the sky after the Sun, Moon and Venus and is also called the ‘ruler of the night skies’. It is the first gaseous planet (Saturn, Uranus and Neptune being the other gas planets) to be discovered in our solar system and radiates twice as much as heat than it absorbs from the sun.1. When was Jupiter discovered and how did it get its name? There is no information regarding who were the first people to discover this large planet. Jupiter is a planet that is visible to the naked eye and is usually the brightest star appearing in the night sky. Which means anyone and everyone can see it. Then who gave Jupiter its name? It’s known that the Romans were the ones who named this large planet, Jupiter after the king of Roman Gods- ‘Jupiter’. Jupiter happened to be the Roman name of the supreme Greek God, Zeus. Since Jupiter appeared big and bright in the sky, they named it after their God. Interestingly, most of the moons of Jupiter are named after the daughters of Jupiter. 2. How do we know all that we know about Jupiter? It was Galileo Galilei in 1610, who through his telescope found that Jupiter had four moons orbiting it. Further, in 1660, Cassini came across bands and spots on Jupiter’s surface and as a result was able to calculate the planet’s period of rotation. However, the first spacecraft to visit and explore Jupiter was Pioneer 10, in 1973.  Pioneer 11(1974), Voyager 1 & 2 (1979) and Ulysses (1992) followed Pioneer 10’s lead and have to be given due credit for bringing to us all these interesting facts about Jupiter. In 1995, Galileo of NASA (only spacecraft to orbit Jupiter) revolved around Jupiter and even today is orbiting around the planet. Cassini in 2000 and NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft in 2007 made their flyby across Jupiter. 3. What is Jupiter actually made of?  Jupiter, called the gaseous giant is a gas planet unlike Earth and Mars which are rocky. What does this mean? It means that Jupiter lacks solid surfaces and is gaseous in composition. It’s a humongous gas cloud comprising gases like Hydrogen, Helium (90% Hydrogen, 10% Helium) and few traces of methane, water, ammonia and rock dust. These gases get converted by the immense pressure to liquid as they go deeper into the planet. The core of Jupiter consists of a molten metal, metallic hydrogen and rock materials. It happens to be bigger than our planet Earth and is about three times hotter than the Earth’s core. 4. How many moons does Jupiter have? Another interesting fact about Jupiter is that it constitutes a miniature solar system within itself. The first four moons of Jupiter were spotted by Galileo and thus are called Galilean satellites. When Galileo made this discovery, he realized that not everything revolves around the Earth in the existing universe. The four moons are named: Io, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto after the Greek Gods and are the largest of Jupiter’s moons. By far, 63 moons have been discovered, most of which have been discovered after 1979. 5. Can we actually see Jupiter? Yes, Jupiter is so large that we don’t need any telescopes to view it. When we look up to the sky at night, the large bright star that we see is Jupiter. In fact, Jupiter is so large that by merely using a pair of binoculars one can view the yellowish orange colored planet. Wait there’s more!  If you’re a little patient you can even see some of Jupiter’s moons right from your terrace. Since the moons are always in motion, you can see at least one moon at any time you choose. Just place your binoculars on some solid surface and adjust your binocular to the planet. You will be able to see the planet. Cool! Isn’t it? But how will you know which moon your viewing. Thanks to tools like Sky and Telescope’s Jupiter’s moons, we can even obtain information pertaining to the moon we’re viewing. 6. Jupiter is big, but how big? Jupiter’s mass (1.9 x 1027 kg ) is 318 times the mass of the Earth, and is 2.5 times the mass of the summation of masses of the other 8 planets in the solar system. Wow! Now that’s what you call massive! But here’s another interesting fact about Jupiter: If Jupiter gets any bigger, it’s actually going to start shrinking. Any increase in mass would make the planet more dense resulting in its pulling of itself.  Jupiter is the largest planet in our solar system and is so large that approximately 1300 Earths can fit in it. It’s diameter is 11.2 times of that of the Earth, and its volume is 1321 times the volume of the Earth. If you still haven’t been able to grasp how enormous Jupiter is, then consider the sizes of Watermelon and grape. How a watermelon is to a grape, so is Jupiter to the Earth. 7. What about the rings of Jupiter? Why can’t we see them?  We are used to associating Saturn with rings and have thought of Saturn as the only planet with rings. Jupiter’s ring system was the third ring system to be discovered, after Saturn’s and Uranus’. It was NASA’s Voyager 1 in 1979, that first discovered Jupiter’s faint, fine, dark rings. However, the rings of Saturn and Jupiter have several differences. Saturn’s rings are brighter and made of ice lumps, whereas Jupiter’s rings are darker, comprising dust and rock particles. Jupiter’s rings are not prominent like that of Saturn, and are very difficult to see.  However, thanks to the spacecraft we now know that the rings have three sections. The innermost section: Halo ring which is a fine dough-nut shaped ring composed of fine dust particles. Extending beyond the inner ring is the brightest ring called the main ring and is followed by an outer ring system called the Gossamer ring. The Gossamer ring consists of two rings: inner Amalthea Gossamer ring and outer Thebe Gossamer ring. When the moons are struck by meteors, the dust generated enters the orbits in the form of rings. 8. What about the well-known ‘Great Red Spot’?  Jupiter’s Great Red Spot (GRS) is like the planet’s birth mark and was initially discovered by Giovanni Cassini way back in 1665. Storms are not uncommon on Jupiter’s surface, however, the storms occurring in the GRS region are much more fiercer. Though GRS is merely an oval spot on the planet’s surface, it is two times the size of the Earth. Jupiter’s color ranges from shades of orange, yellow and brown, however, GRS appears to be a darker shade of red.  Astronomers believe this is because GRS draws darker compounds from the planet’s interior, which when exposed to the sunlight become brownish red. Until a century ago, GRS measured up to 40,000 km, however, its size appears to be shrinking and now measures half its size. Astronomers are not sure if this legendary Great Red Spot will disappear forever or not. So if you still haven’t seen it, it’s high time you should before it disappears.9. How long is a day and a year on Jupiter?  Having the fastest rotation in the entire solar system, a day in Jupiter consists of only 9.9 hours. Due to its fast spinning feature, it is flattened at the poles and bulged at the equator. But here’s the interesting fact about Jupiter: not all parts of Jupiter complete rotating in the same amount of time. For example, the parts near Jupiter’s poles take 9 hours and 56 minutes, whereas the parts near its equator take 9 hours 50 minutes.  Even though Jupiter’s rotation is faster than any other planet, its revolution around the Sun is slow. This is because it is situated far away from the Sun (average of 470 million miles) and as a result takes 11.86 Earth years to complete one revolution. Jupiter follows an elliptical path around the Sun and at its closest point is only 741 million km from the Sun, whereas at its farthest point is 817 million km. 10. Can human beings live on Jupiter? First and foremost, if at all we get a spacecraft and head for Jupiter, when we land on Jupiter we won’t find any place for landing. Why? Because Jupiter has no solid surfaces and is composed of gases. The gaseous clouds of Jupiter continue to get denser towards the core, thereby resulting into increase in pressure. And what would happen if we tried to jump onto Jupiter’s surface from the spacecraft? We would sink into the clouds and the increase in pressure would crush us to bits. If the increase in pressure somehow fails to kill us, then definitely the high temperatures near the core would vaporize us. So either way we’re doomed! Another interesting fact about Jupiter is that it sucks anything and everything that’s around it by exerting its tremendous gravitational force on them. Just like how dust gets sucked into a vacuum cleaner, so also asteroids, meteors, comets and other rocky materials traveling around it are seen to be sucked into the planet’s atmosphere.

via expose-the-light

crazy science facts

sagansense:

10 Things we want to know about Jupiter

Jupiter, the largest planet of our solar system is the fifth planet after the Sun, and lies between the planets, Mars and Saturn. It is also the fourth brightest object in the sky after the Sun, Moon and Venus and is also called the ‘ruler of the night skies’. It is the first gaseous planet (Saturn, Uranus and Neptune being the other gas planets) to be discovered in our solar system and radiates twice as much as heat than it absorbs from the sun.

1. When was Jupiter discovered and how did it get its name?

There is no information regarding who were the first people to discover this large planet. Jupiter is a planet that is visible to the naked eye and is usually the brightest star appearing in the night sky. Which means anyone and everyone can see it. Then who gave Jupiter its name? It’s known that the Romans were the ones who named this large planet, Jupiter after the king of Roman Gods- ‘Jupiter’. Jupiter happened to be the Roman name of the supreme Greek God, Zeus. Since Jupiter appeared big and bright in the sky, they named it after their God. Interestingly, most of the moons of Jupiter are named after the daughters of Jupiter.

2. How do we know all that we know about Jupiter?

It was Galileo Galilei in 1610, who through his telescope found that Jupiter had four moons orbiting it. Further, in 1660, Cassini came across bands and spots on Jupiter’s surface and as a result was able to calculate the planet’s period of rotation. However, the first spacecraft to visit and explore Jupiter was Pioneer 10, in 1973.

Pioneer 11(1974), Voyager 1 & 2 (1979) and Ulysses (1992) followed Pioneer 10’s lead and have to be given due credit for bringing to us all these interesting facts about Jupiter. In 1995, Galileo of NASA (only spacecraft to orbit Jupiter) revolved around Jupiter and even today is orbiting around the planet. Cassini in 2000 and NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft in 2007 made their flyby across Jupiter.

3. What is Jupiter actually made of?

Jupiter, called the gaseous giant is a gas planet unlike Earth and Mars which are rocky. What does this mean? It means that Jupiter lacks solid surfaces and is gaseous in composition. It’s a humongous gas cloud comprising gases like Hydrogen, Helium (90% Hydrogen, 10% Helium) and few traces of methane, water, ammonia and rock dust. These gases get converted by the immense pressure to liquid as they go deeper into the planet. The core of Jupiter consists of a molten metal, metallic hydrogen and rock materials. It happens to be bigger than our planet Earth and is about three times hotter than the Earth’s core.

4. How many moons does Jupiter have?

Another interesting fact about Jupiter is that it constitutes a miniature solar system within itself. The first four moons of Jupiter were spotted by Galileo and thus are called Galilean satellites. When Galileo made this discovery, he realized that not everything revolves around the Earth in the existing universe. The four moons are named: Io, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto after the Greek Gods and are the largest of Jupiter’s moons. By far, 63 moons have been discovered, most of which have been discovered after 1979.

5. Can we actually see Jupiter?

Yes, Jupiter is so large that we don’t need any telescopes to view it. When we look up to the sky at night, the large bright star that we see is Jupiter. In fact, Jupiter is so large that by merely using a pair of binoculars one can view the yellowish orange colored planet. Wait there’s more!

If you’re a little patient you can even see some of Jupiter’s moons right from your terrace. Since the moons are always in motion, you can see at least one moon at any time you choose. Just place your binoculars on some solid surface and adjust your binocular to the planet. You will be able to see the planet. Cool! Isn’t it? But how will you know which moon your viewing. Thanks to tools like Sky and Telescope’s Jupiter’s moons, we can even obtain information pertaining to the moon we’re viewing.

6. Jupiter is big, but how big?

Jupiter’s mass (1.9 x 1027 kg ) is 318 times the mass of the Earth, and is 2.5 times the mass of the summation of masses of the other 8 planets in the solar system. Wow! Now that’s what you call massive! But here’s another interesting fact about Jupiter: If Jupiter gets any bigger, it’s actually going to start shrinking. Any increase in mass would make the planet more dense resulting in its pulling of itself.

Jupiter is the largest planet in our solar system and is so large that approximately 1300 Earths can fit in it. It’s diameter is 11.2 times of that of the Earth, and its volume is 1321 times the volume of the Earth. If you still haven’t been able to grasp how enormous Jupiter is, then consider the sizes of Watermelon and grape. How a watermelon is to a grape, so is Jupiter to the Earth.

7. What about the rings of Jupiter? Why can’t we see them?

We are used to associating Saturn with rings and have thought of Saturn as the only planet with rings. Jupiter’s ring system was the third ring system to be discovered, after Saturn’s and Uranus’. It was NASA’s Voyager 1 in 1979, that first discovered Jupiter’s faint, fine, dark rings. However, the rings of Saturn and Jupiter have several differences. Saturn’s rings are brighter and made of ice lumps, whereas Jupiter’s rings are darker, comprising dust and rock particles. Jupiter’s rings are not prominent like that of Saturn, and are very difficult to see.

However, thanks to the spacecraft we now know that the rings have three sections. The innermost section: Halo ring which is a fine dough-nut shaped ring composed of fine dust particles. Extending beyond the inner ring is the brightest ring called the main ring and is followed by an outer ring system called the Gossamer ring. The Gossamer ring consists of two rings: inner Amalthea Gossamer ring and outer Thebe Gossamer ring. When the moons are struck by meteors, the dust generated enters the orbits in the form of rings.

8. What about the well-known ‘Great Red Spot’?

Jupiter’s Great Red Spot (GRS) is like the planet’s birth mark and was initially discovered by Giovanni Cassini way back in 1665. Storms are not uncommon on Jupiter’s surface, however, the storms occurring in the GRS region are much more fiercer. Though GRS is merely an oval spot on the planet’s surface, it is two times the size of the Earth. Jupiter’s color ranges from shades of orange, yellow and brown, however, GRS appears to be a darker shade of red.

Astronomers believe this is because GRS draws darker compounds from the planet’s interior, which when exposed to the sunlight become brownish red. Until a century ago, GRS measured up to 40,000 km, however, its size appears to be shrinking and now measures half its size. Astronomers are not sure if this legendary Great Red Spot will disappear forever or not. So if you still haven’t seen it, it’s high time you should before it disappears.

9. How long is a day and a year on Jupiter?

Having the fastest rotation in the entire solar system, a day in Jupiter consists of only 9.9 hours. Due to its fast spinning feature, it is flattened at the poles and bulged at the equator. But here’s the interesting fact about Jupiter: not all parts of Jupiter complete rotating in the same amount of time. For example, the parts near Jupiter’s poles take 9 hours and 56 minutes, whereas the parts near its equator take 9 hours 50 minutes.

Even though Jupiter’s rotation is faster than any other planet, its revolution around the Sun is slow. This is because it is situated far away from the Sun (average of 470 million miles) and as a result takes 11.86 Earth years to complete one revolution. Jupiter follows an elliptical path around the Sun and at its closest point is only 741 million km from the Sun, whereas at its farthest point is 817 million km.

10. Can human beings live on Jupiter?

First and foremost, if at all we get a spacecraft and head for Jupiter, when we land on Jupiter we won’t find any place for landing. Why? Because Jupiter has no solid surfaces and is composed of gases. The gaseous clouds of Jupiter continue to get denser towards the core, thereby resulting into increase in pressure. And what would happen if we tried to jump onto Jupiter’s surface from the spacecraft? We would sink into the clouds and the increase in pressure would crush us to bits. If the increase in pressure somehow fails to kill us, then definitely the high temperatures near the core would vaporize us. So either way we’re doomed!

Another interesting fact about Jupiter is that it sucks anything and everything that’s around it by exerting its tremendous gravitational force on them. Just like how dust gets sucked into a vacuum cleaner, so also asteroids, meteors, comets and other rocky materials traveling around it are seen to be sucked into the planet’s atmosphere.

via expose-the-light

crazy science facts

#science   #facts   #jupiter   #astronomy   #planet   #solar system   #gif   #queue  
jtotheizzoe:

Here’s a really nice illustration of a very important principle of evolution.
While we’re talking about good illustrations of evolution, have you seen the Line Drawing Test before?

jtotheizzoe:

Here’s a really nice illustration of a very important principle of evolution.

While we’re talking about good illustrations of evolution, have you seen the Line Drawing Test before?

(Source: possessthenight)

#evolution   #science   #facts  
crookedindifference:

Statistics of the Genocide 
The Rwandan Genocide of 1994 was a truly traumatic and horrifying event. It was one of the most brutal acts of murder ever committed.
Over the course of 100 days from April 6 to July 16 1994, an estimated 800,000 to 1 million Tutsis and some moderate Hutus were slaughtered in the Rwandan genocide. A recent report has estimated the number to be close to 2 million.
During this period of terrible slaughter, more than 6 men, women and children were murdered every minute of every hour of every day. This brutally efficient killing was maintained for more than 3 months.
There are between 300,000 to 400,000 survivors of the genocide
Between 250,000 and 500,000 women were raped during the 100 days of genocide. Up to 20,000 children were born to women as a result of rape.
More than 67% of women who were raped in 1994 during the genocide were infected with HIV and AIDS. In many cases, this resulted from a systematic and planned use of rape by HIV+ men as a weapon of genocide.
There are 10 times as many widows than widowers – almost 50,000 widows of the genocide.
Nearly 100,000 survivors are aged between 14 and 21, of which 60,000 are categorised as very vulnerable.
75,000 of survivors were orphaned as a result of the genocide.
Of those that survived the genocide over half the children stopped their schooling, because of poverty.
40,000 survivors are still without shelter, many whose homes were destroyed in the genocide.
7 in 10 survivors earn a monthly income of less than 5000 Rwandan Francs (Equivalent to 8 (eight) American Dollars)

crookedindifference:

Statistics of the Genocide

The Rwandan Genocide of 1994 was a truly traumatic and horrifying event. It was one of the most brutal acts of murder ever committed.

  • Over the course of 100 days from April 6 to July 16 1994, an estimated 800,000 to 1 million Tutsis and some moderate Hutus were slaughtered in the Rwandan genocide. A recent report has estimated the number to be close to 2 million.
  • During this period of terrible slaughter, more than 6 men, women and children were murdered every minute of every hour of every day. This brutally efficient killing was maintained for more than 3 months.
  • There are between 300,000 to 400,000 survivors of the genocide
  • Between 250,000 and 500,000 women were raped during the 100 days of genocide. Up to 20,000 children were born to women as a result of rape.
  • More than 67% of women who were raped in 1994 during the genocide were infected with HIV and AIDS. In many cases, this resulted from a systematic and planned use of rape by HIV+ men as a weapon of genocide.
  • There are 10 times as many widows than widowers – almost 50,000 widows of the genocide.
  • Nearly 100,000 survivors are aged between 14 and 21, of which 60,000 are categorised as very vulnerable.
  • 75,000 of survivors were orphaned as a result of the genocide.
  • Of those that survived the genocide over half the children stopped their schooling, because of poverty.
  • 40,000 survivors are still without shelter, many whose homes were destroyed in the genocide.
  • 7 in 10 survivors earn a monthly income of less than 5000 Rwandan Francs (Equivalent to 8 (eight) American Dollars)

(via crookedindifference)

#rwanda   #conflict   #genocide   #facts  
canisfamiliaris:

15 Astronomical Facts You Probably Do NOT Know

click to embiggen (to learn a few things you may not know; quite a few you probably do know because they’re all over the tumblrverse)

canisfamiliaris:

15 Astronomical Facts You Probably Do NOT Know

click to embiggen (to learn a few things you may not know; quite a few you probably do know because they’re all over the tumblrverse)

#astronomy   #science   #facts  
14-billion-years-later:

The Life and Death of StarsI know tumblr is mostly filled of awe-inspiring, but physically quite dull nebulas, so here is a crash course in the life cycle of stars. Which are totally way cooler.ProtostarsStars begin their lives rather unassumingly as blobs of gas in molecular clouds that slowly grow in density even though they’re still less dense than vaccuum chambers on Earth. Slowly gravity pulls in more atoms and molecules, mostly hydrogen and helium until there’s a gravitational instability that causes this cloud to go over the tipping point and begin to collapse itself. This can be brought about by strong gravitational effects, such as the death of another star as a supernova. The collapse itself is known as a Jeans instability. As this happens the gravitational energy gives way to heat energy and the blob of gas rapidly begins to heat up and a protostellar core forms. This contraction typically takes between 10 and 15 million years.Main phaseThe star spends the majority of it’s lifetime in the main phase, what this is when the heat of the star reaches a high enough temperature to allow a fusion reaction of hydrogen into helium. The beginning of this phase is comprised of relatively small stars known as red and yellow dwarfs (our sun is a yellow dwarf). There is another type of object known as a brown dwarf and is essentially a star that did not reach enough mass or temperature to begin the fusion reaction. As the helium concentration of a star increases it gradually swells and increases in temperature. Stars can spend a range of time in the main sequence, our sun is predicted to last 10^10 years, while others may live much shorter or much longer. A red dwarf for example will last hundreds of billions of years, older than the universe is now.Post-main SequenceThis is the phase characterized by red giants which are stars that begin to expand and cool releasing shells of gas to form planetary nebula. Larger red giants however begin the next stage in their life, they then begin to heat up again in the layer around the core and begin the fusion of helium into heavier atoms like cosmic furnaces. It’s stars like this that are the reason you’re alive. Stars that are yet more massive, about 9 solar masses become what is imaginatively known as red supergiants in their helium fusing stage. Towards the end of their lives these stars are fusing different elements at different layers, helium on the outside and getting progressively larger elements as we head towards the center like an incredibly hot, giant onion.The collapse
Finally after billions of years we come to the death of a star. This can occur in many different ways, some relatively peaceful, others violent. Most average sized stars begin to shed their outer layers and the core compresses to form a white dwarf, with mass that of the sun and size that of the Earth these guys are pretty dense. They’re also made from electron-degenerative matter which can be thought of as atoms or molecules in which the electrons occupy higher than normal energy levels due to the high amount of pressure and energy concentrated in a small space.
Larger stars which have made it all the way to synthesizing iron have a more dramatic exit, the iron core of the center grows so dense and massive that the atoms the atoms themselves become crushed causing electrons to collapse into their protons. This itself causes the famous event known as a supernova. From here there are two other remaining options, most stars will remain as nothing more than incredibly dense neutron stars (such as pulsars) while even more massive ones will collapse until they occupy no space at all, becoming black holes.

I love learning! Thanks for this :D

14-billion-years-later:

The Life and Death of Stars

I know tumblr is mostly filled of awe-inspiring, but physically quite dull nebulas, so here is a crash course in the life cycle of stars. Which are totally way cooler.

Protostars

Stars begin their lives rather unassumingly as blobs of gas in molecular clouds that slowly grow in density even though they’re still less dense than vaccuum chambers on Earth. Slowly gravity pulls in more atoms and molecules, mostly hydrogen and helium until there’s a gravitational instability that causes this cloud to go over the tipping point and begin to collapse itself. This can be brought about by strong gravitational effects, such as the death of another star as a supernova. The collapse itself is known as a Jeans instability. As this happens the gravitational energy gives way to heat energy and the blob of gas rapidly begins to heat up and a protostellar core forms. This contraction typically takes between 10 and 15 million years.

Main phase

The star spends the majority of it’s lifetime in the main phase, what this is when the heat of the star reaches a high enough temperature to allow a fusion reaction of hydrogen into helium. The beginning of this phase is comprised of relatively small stars known as red and yellow dwarfs (our sun is a yellow dwarf). There is another type of object known as a brown dwarf and is essentially a star that did not reach enough mass or temperature to begin the fusion reaction. As the helium concentration of a star increases it gradually swells and increases in temperature. 

Stars can spend a range of time in the main sequence, our sun is predicted to last 10^10 years, while others may live much shorter or much longer. A red dwarf for example will last hundreds of billions of years, older than the universe is now.

Post-main Sequence

This is the phase characterized by red giants which are stars that begin to expand and cool releasing shells of gas to form planetary nebula. Larger red giants however begin the next stage in their life, they then begin to heat up again in the layer around the core and begin the fusion of helium into heavier atoms like cosmic furnaces. It’s stars like this that are the reason you’re alive. Stars that are yet more massive, about 9 solar masses become what is imaginatively known as red supergiants in their helium fusing stage. Towards the end of their lives these stars are fusing different elements at different layers, helium on the outside and getting progressively larger elements as we head towards the center like an incredibly hot, giant onion.

The collapse

Finally after billions of years we come to the death of a star. This can occur in many different ways, some relatively peaceful, others violent. Most average sized stars begin to shed their outer layers and the core compresses to form a white dwarf, with mass that of the sun and size that of the Earth these guys are pretty dense. They’re also made from electron-degenerative matter which can be thought of as atoms or molecules in which the electrons occupy higher than normal energy levels due to the high amount of pressure and energy concentrated in a small space.

Larger stars which have made it all the way to synthesizing iron have a more dramatic exit, the iron core of the center grows so dense and massive that the atoms the atoms themselves become crushed causing electrons to collapse into their protons. This itself causes the famous event known as a supernova. From here there are two other remaining options, most stars will remain as nothing more than incredibly dense neutron stars (such as pulsars) while even more massive ones will collapse until they occupy no space at all, becoming black holes.

I love learning! Thanks for this :D

(via scientistintraining)

#science   #stars   #space   #nebula   #facts   #the universe   #cosmos   #astronomy  
animalworld:

Why Do HORSES Sleep Standing Up? (by Request)Equus Ferus Caballus“Siesta” ©-GreenA-
Though it’s not biologically required, horses do most of their sleeping standing up. Their legs can lock          in place, enabling them to fall asleep without falling over. Because they          are prey animals, horses often don’t feel comfortable sleeping on the          ground, and most of their sleeping is done during the day rather than          at night when the predators are out hunting.
Horses have straight backs, so they cannot get up quickly. If a predator          were to come while a horse was on the ground, they might not be able to          get up fast enough to get away. However, horses do occasionally take short          naps laying down during the day. This helps them to rest their legs. You          can sometimes find a horse stretched out on its side, asleep in the sun,          or laying on the ground with its legs folded under. When horses are in          groups, they will often take turns ‘guarding’ each other as they rest,          with one horse standing up near the sleeping horse. This behavior would          help to keep a wild horse from being attacked during a nap.
So, if you see a horse lying down (like the one pictured above), you can be sure that the animal is feeling pretty secure in its surroundings.
Fact Source: http://www.ultimatehorsesite.com/info/hq_sleepstandingup.html
Other photos you may like:
Spanish Andalusian Stallion
Przewalski’s Horse
World’s SMALLEST Horse
Lovely Horse Portrait

animalworld:

Why Do HORSES Sleep Standing Up? (by Request)
Equus Ferus Caballus
“Siesta” ©-GreenA-

Though it’s not biologically required, horses do most of their sleeping standing up. Their legs can lock in place, enabling them to fall asleep without falling over. Because they are prey animals, horses often don’t feel comfortable sleeping on the ground, and most of their sleeping is done during the day rather than at night when the predators are out hunting.

Horses have straight backs, so they cannot get up quickly. If a predator were to come while a horse was on the ground, they might not be able to get up fast enough to get away. However, horses do occasionally take short naps laying down during the day. This helps them to rest their legs. You can sometimes find a horse stretched out on its side, asleep in the sun, or laying on the ground with its legs folded under. When horses are in groups, they will often take turns ‘guarding’ each other as they rest, with one horse standing up near the sleeping horse. This behavior would help to keep a wild horse from being attacked during a nap.

So, if you see a horse lying down (like the one pictured above), you can be sure that the animal is feeling pretty secure in its surroundings.

Fact Source: http://www.ultimatehorsesite.com/info/hq_sleepstandingup.html

Other photos you may like:

Spanish Andalusian Stallion

Przewalski’s Horse

World’s SMALLEST Horse

Lovely Horse Portrait

#horses   #animals   #facts   #sleep