Suzanna. In love with a schnauzer named Mimzy. Instagram
Africa’s North Korea
…[T]he military has taken over virtually every aspect of Eritrean life.  Despite its tiny size, Eritrea has the largest army in sub-Saharan  Africa, with as many as 320,000 soldiers. Its number of soldiers per  capita puts Eritrea second only to North Korea,  a feat made possible by the ruthless enforcement of mandatory national  service for all citizens, men and women alike. Over dinner one evening, a  resident U.N. staffer whispered to me about a new expansion of the  requirement. To graduate from high school, she explained, youth were now  required to attend “national camp” during their final year. Although  the government claims this amounts to only a week or two of military  training, it in fact lasts much of the year. Her agency had learned that  the threat of physical and sexual abuse was causing increasing numbers  of students to drop out rather than attend. But by failing to complete  their service, they put themselves at constant risk of arrest.

Africa’s North Korea

…[T]he military has taken over virtually every aspect of Eritrean life. Despite its tiny size, Eritrea has the largest army in sub-Saharan Africa, with as many as 320,000 soldiers. Its number of soldiers per capita puts Eritrea second only to North Korea, a feat made possible by the ruthless enforcement of mandatory national service for all citizens, men and women alike. Over dinner one evening, a resident U.N. staffer whispered to me about a new expansion of the requirement. To graduate from high school, she explained, youth were now required to attend “national camp” during their final year. Although the government claims this amounts to only a week or two of military training, it in fact lasts much of the year. Her agency had learned that the threat of physical and sexual abuse was causing increasing numbers of students to drop out rather than attend. But by failing to complete their service, they put themselves at constant risk of arrest.

#africa   #eritrea   #military   #government   #failed states   #economy  
caraobrien:

Postcards from Hell, 2011: Images from the world’s most failed states
Rafael Sanchez Fabres/LatinContent/Getty Images
#failed states   #economy   #politics   #poverty   #somalia   #war   #famine   #chad   #africa   #sudan   #haiti   #latin america   #caribbean   #drc   #congo   #zimbabwe   #afghanistan   #middle east   #central african republic   #car   #Democratic Republic of Congo   #iraq   #ivory coast   #guinea   #pakistan   #yemen   #nigeria   #niger   #kenya   #birundi  
Whether or not Yemen, Iraq, Pakistan, or the Democratic Republic of the Congo technically qualify as “failed states,” their fates are sealed by their colonial inheritance. Indeed, it’s often their borders that are the deepest cause of their conflicts. Many of these national borders are in desperate need of adjustment, and the rest of the world should show more flexibility in allowing them to do so. Europe messed it up the first time, but now the West can support the right regional bodies to adjudicate these new borders — helping others help themselves in the process.

By this logic, today’s hot spots such as Iraq and Afghanistan are not simply “America’s Wars.” Rather, they are to some extent the unexploded ordinance left over from old European wars, with their fuses lit on slow release. Indeed, the United States had nothing to do with the Sykes-Picot and other agreements that parceled the Levant into French- and British-allied monarchies, or the Congress of Berlin, which drew suspiciously straight lines on Africa’s map. Some of these haphazard agreements created oversized or artificial agglomerations like Sudan, which threw together heretofore independent groups of Arabs, Africans, Christians, and Muslims into a country one-fourth the size of the United States but lacking any common national ethos or adequate distribution of resources to sustain commitment to unity. Others did the opposite, like the British officer Henry Mortimer Durand, whose infamous line divided the Pashtun nation between Afghanistan and Pakistan.

This growing cartographic stress is not just America’s challenge. All the world’s influential powers and diplomats should seize a new moral high ground by agreeing to prudently apply in such cases Woodrow Wilson’s support for self-determination of peoples. This would be a marked improvement over today’s ad hoc system of backing disreputable allies, assembling unworkable coalitions, or simply hoping for tidy dissolutions. Reasserting the principle of self-determination would allow for the sort of true statesmanship lacking on today’s global stage.

Breaking Up Is Good to Do (via caraobrien)

The remnants of colonialism in the form of scars on the landscape often result in unnecessary conflict and bloodshed

(via caraobrien)