Suzanna. In love with a schnauzer named Mimzy. Instagram
unicef:

Two years after the quakeHaiti and its approximately 4.3 million children continue to recover from the 2010 earthquake that killed some 220,000 people and displaced more than 1.6 million. Advances in education have been substantial, with over 1,200 schools repaired or constructed. Still, half of eligible children do not attend primary school.
Here…children attend class at St. Gérard School, rebuilt with UNICEF support, in Port-au-Prince.
© UNICEF/ /Marco Dormino
For more information, please visit: http://www.unicef.org

unicef:

Two years after the quake
Haiti and its approximately 4.3 million children continue to recover from the 2010 earthquake that killed some 220,000 people and displaced more than 1.6 million. Advances in education have been substantial, with over 1,200 schools repaired or constructed. Still, half of eligible children do not attend primary school.

Here…children attend class at St. Gérard School, rebuilt with UNICEF support, in Port-au-Prince.

© UNICEF/ /Marco Dormino

For more information, please visit: http://www.unicef.org

(via united-nations)

#haiti   #un   #earthquake   #recovery   #education   #unicef  
Hundreds of thousands of people still live under terrible conditions in makeshift camps. Access to drinking water and sanitation is very limited throughout the entire country, particularly in rural and remote areas. This situation promotes the spread of infectious disease. While the number of new cases of cholera has fallen considerably, we still see several hundred each week and the risk of seasonal resurgence remains very high. We must remain extremely vigilant.
#quote   #msf   #wendy lai   #haiti  
doctorswithoutborders:

One year after a devastating earthquake killed an estimated 222,000 people and left 1.5 million people homeless on January 12, 2010, Haitians continued to endure appalling living conditions amid a nationwide cholera outbreak, despite the largest humanitarian aid deployment in the world.
Now two years later, MSF is increasing hospital capacity in earthquake-affected areas as 500,000 people are still officially displaced and access to health care is nearly non-existent.
Photo: Haiti 2010 © Kadir van Lohuizen / NOOR

doctorswithoutborders:

One year after a devastating earthquake killed an estimated 222,000 people and left 1.5 million people homeless on January 12, 2010, Haitians continued to endure appalling living conditions amid a nationwide cholera outbreak, despite the largest humanitarian aid deployment in the world.

Now two years later, MSF is increasing hospital capacity in earthquake-affected areas as 500,000 people are still officially displaced and access to health care is nearly non-existent.

Photo: Haiti 2010 © Kadir van Lohuizen / NOOR

#haiti   #human rights   #earthquake   #cholera   #un   #msf  
caraobrien:

Postcards from Hell, 2011: Images from the world’s most failed states
Rafael Sanchez Fabres/LatinContent/Getty Images
#failed states   #economy   #politics   #poverty   #somalia   #war   #famine   #chad   #africa   #sudan   #haiti   #latin america   #caribbean   #drc   #congo   #zimbabwe   #afghanistan   #middle east   #central african republic   #car   #Democratic Republic of Congo   #iraq   #ivory coast   #guinea   #pakistan   #yemen   #nigeria   #niger   #kenya   #birundi  
Two years ago, Haiti unanimously passed a law sharply raising its minimum wage to 61 cents an hour. That doesn’t sound like much (and it isn’t), but it was two and a half times the then-minimum of 24 cents an hour.

This infuriated American corporations like Hanes and Levi Strauss that pay Haitians slave wages to sew their clothes. They said they would only fork over a seven-cent-an-hour increase, and they got the State Department involved. The U.S. ambassador put pressure on Haiti’s president, who duly carved out a $3 a day minimum wage for textile companies (the U.S. minimum wage, which itself is very low, works out to $58 a day).

Obama administration put pressure on Haiti not to increase its minimum wage.  (via redforgender)

horrifying.

(via thismakesmeanxious)

Horrifying, indeed.

I need to educate myself better about what companies use basically slave labor so I can avoid them. But unfortunately it’s probably a lot of them. :(

(via mrsdalloway)

It’s things like this that Americans have a hard time wrapping their heads around. The US government is notorious for doing things like this, and when it backfires on them, they twist things in their favor.  

(via thegirlwhoknewtoomuch)

Hope and change, anyone?

(via mikroblogolas)

Corporations own this country and therefore, they own many other countries as well. It’s really sickening to see the people “in charge of us” choosing the bank statements of corporations over the general welfare of people.

(via deepwithfuture)

(via deepwithfuture)

#quote   #haiti   #politics   #obama   #minimum wage   #human rights  
Woman puts her hand near a crack on a wall as she waits for food distribution in Port-au-Prince, Haiti January 27, 2010. A shallow 4.9 magnitude aftershock rattled western Haiti on Tuesday, two weeks after a killer 7.0 magnitude earthquake devastated the Haitian capital, Port-au-Prince, the U.S. Geological Service said. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Woman puts her hand near a crack on a wall as she waits for food distribution in Port-au-Prince, Haiti January 27, 2010. A shallow 4.9 magnitude aftershock rattled western Haiti on Tuesday, two weeks after a killer 7.0 magnitude earthquake devastated the Haitian capital, Port-au-Prince, the U.S. Geological Service said. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

rightsandhumanity:

Haiti’s cholera outbreak is spreading quickly and may result in hundreds of thousands of cases over the course of a year, warns Nigel Fisher, United Nations humanitarian coordinator in Haiti. Efforts to prevent more deaths from the outbreak are being hampered by bureaucracy and a lack of dedicated fund, according to Fisher.

#haiti   #cholera   #un   #news   #disease  

rightsandhumanity:

The death toll from the cholera outbreak gripping Haiti has risen to more than 900. The UN is concerned about the devastating effect the outbreak could have if it becomes out of control in Port au Prince, where more than 1 million people still live in camps after the earthquake in January. The agency has appealed for US$164 million in aid.

via the Lancet

#cholera   #haiti   #earthquake   #water   #aid  
Perspective. 

Perspective. 

(via mohandasgandhi)

#news   #haiti   #cholera   #priviledge   #cruise ship  
newsweek:

Ten months after the quake, Haitians scour a Port-au-Prince garbage dump for food and supplies (more photos from Antonio Bolfo here).  On Haiti’s recovery, Jeneen Interlandi writes, “The people of Haiti need food, shelter, and clean water, but they also  want their country back, and eventually they may have to reclaim it from  the very people who rushed there to save them.”

newsweek:

Ten months after the quake, Haitians scour a Port-au-Prince garbage dump for food and supplies (more photos from Antonio Bolfo here).  On Haiti’s recovery, Jeneen Interlandi writes, “The people of Haiti need food, shelter, and clean water, but they also want their country back, and eventually they may have to reclaim it from the very people who rushed there to save them.”

(via latikaaaa-deactivated20110131-d)

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