Suzanna. In love with a schnauzer named Mimzy. Instagram
thelandofmaps:

Early Human migration from Africa to all corners of the world [1,911 x 1,422]CLICK HERE FOR MORE MAPS!thelandofmaps.tumblr.com

thelandofmaps:

Early Human migration from Africa to all corners of the world [1,911 x 1,422]
CLICK HERE FOR MORE MAPS!
thelandofmaps.tumblr.com

(via fuckyeahcartography)

#migration   #humans   #evolution   #science   #palaeoanthropology   #homo sapiens   #queue   #global   #earth  

crankydinosaur:


Eukaryota (cells with a nucleus)

Animalia (multicellular life that feeds on other organic matter)

Bilatera (bilaterally symmetrical with three cellular layers)

Deuterostomia (anus forms first, then the mouth)

Chordata (possessing a notochord at some point of their development)

Craniata (possessing a distinct skull)

Vertebrata (animals with backbones)

Gnathostomata (animals with jaws)

Sarcopterygii (Lobe finned fish and their terrestrial descendants)

Tetrapoda (terrestrial four legged animals )

Amniota (animals whose eggs contain several membranes)

Synapsida (possessing a single hole behind the eye within their skulls)

Therapsida (animals whose legs are held under the body and possess more advance teeth)

Theriodontia (having more mammalian type teeth)

Cynodontia (reduced number of bones in jaw and possessing a secondary palate)

Mammals (animals that possess hair and produce milk through their mammary glands)

Theria (animals that give birth without the use of a shelled egg)

Eutheria (animals that possess a placenta)

Epitheria (possessing stirrup shaped stapes in the middle ear)

Boreoeutheria (contains the taxa of Laurasiatheria and Euarchontoglires)

Euarchontoglires (contains the clades of Glires and  Euachonta)

Euarchonta (contains the order of Scadentia, and miroder Primatomorpha)

Primatomorpha (contains the orders of Dermoptera and Primata)

Primata (having hands, forward facing eyes and binocular vision)

Haplorhini (tarsiers, monkeys and apes)

Simiiformes (new world monkeys, old world monkeys, and apes)

Catarrhini (old world monkeys and apes)

Hominoidea (the lesser and greater apes)

Hominidae (the great apes: orangutans, gorillas, chimpanzees, and humans)

Homininae (gorillas, chimpanzees, and humans)

Homo (Modern humans and their ancestors)


SCIENCE!!!

nifters 

jtotheizzoe:

movingthestill:

Title: Space travelArtist: Jolene Wong (sofilledwithfeeling)

It’s no wonder I feel so exhausted.

jtotheizzoe:

movingthestill:

Title: Space travel
Artist: Jolene Wong (sofilledwithfeeling)

It’s no wonder I feel so exhausted.

#astronomy   #earth   #science   #humans   #gif   #submission  
discoverynews:

 Two Months Until the Mayan Doomsday Nonevent

For some reason, people really want to remind the world that Oct. 21 marks two months before the biggest nonevent in recent history. Even more perplexing is the fact that others seem to really want the world to end in 61 days time.
Why do these strange individuals want us to believe in this nonsense? Some have a book to sell, while others have a horribly-edited YouTube video they want to share. Others are just plain odd. But regardless of the intent, the result is confusion and fear. Sadly, it is often people who would have otherwise gotten on with their lives peacefully who have swallowed the doomsday nonsense and become needlessly worried about the end of the world.
But wait! There are still Mayan descendents who live in Central America. Are they currently digging bunkers and stocking up on canned “Apocalypse-ready” baked beans? Um, no. Why’s that then?
The Mayans never predicted doomsday! The end of a calendar cycle doesn’t mean it’s doomsday. The calendar wasn’t a magic calendar, it was just a way to document time, remember future dates and record past events. That’s what calendars do. Lacking a culture to renew the Long Count, it looks like the final cycle — the 13th bak’tun — will come to an end… and that’s about it.

read the full piece…

sometimes I wish the world would end, but then I get sad because ducks would no longer exist. 

discoverynews:

Two Months Until the Mayan Doomsday Nonevent

For some reason, people really want to remind the world that Oct. 21 marks two months before the biggest nonevent in recent history. Even more perplexing is the fact that others seem to really want the world to end in 61 days time.

Why do these strange individuals want us to believe in this nonsense? Some have a book to sell, while others have a horribly-edited YouTube video they want to share. Others are just plain odd. But regardless of the intent, the result is confusion and fear. Sadly, it is often people who would have otherwise gotten on with their lives peacefully who have swallowed the doomsday nonsense and become needlessly worried about the end of the world.

But wait! There are still Mayan descendents who live in Central America. Are they currently digging bunkers and stocking up on canned “Apocalypse-ready” baked beans? Um, no. Why’s that then?

The Mayans never predicted doomsday! The end of a calendar cycle doesn’t mean it’s doomsday. The calendar wasn’t a magic calendar, it was just a way to document time, remember future dates and record past events. That’s what calendars do. Lacking a culture to renew the Long Count, it looks like the final cycle — the 13th bak’tun — will come to an end… and that’s about it.

read the full piece…

sometimes I wish the world would end, but then I get sad because ducks would no longer exist. 

#humans   #humanity   #human behavior   #doomsday   #apocalypse   #end of the world   #science   #2012  
discoverynews:

i wonder what it would take for this to happen again… would China have to launch people to the moon or mars to get American’s excited about space again?
The Psychology of Sputnik

Fifty-five years ago today, the Soviet Union launched history’s first artificial satellite.
Sputnik was an innocuous satellite; Soviet scientists behind the launch were just happy to successfully put the probe into orbit. But in the United States the reaction was different.
The engineering feat very quickly gave way to hysteria and paranoia. President Eisenhower initially downplayed the role of the satellite as a threat to find that he’d grossly underestimated its psychological impact.

read the full story…

discoverynews:

i wonder what it would take for this to happen again… would China have to launch people to the moon or mars to get American’s excited about space again?

The Psychology of Sputnik

Fifty-five years ago today, the Soviet Union launched history’s first artificial satellite.

Sputnik was an innocuous satellite; Soviet scientists behind the launch were just happy to successfully put the probe into orbit. But in the United States the reaction was different.

The engineering feat very quickly gave way to hysteria and paranoia. President Eisenhower initially downplayed the role of the satellite as a threat to find that he’d grossly underestimated its psychological impact.

read the full story…

#space   #Russians   #russia space   #satellite   #communication   #history   #technology   #tech   #humanity   #humans   #psychology   #science   #anniversaries   #space race   #sputnik   #russia  
discoverynews:

500 Million-Year-Old ‘Mistake’ Led to Humans
A spineless creature experienced two doublings in DNA, triggering the evolution of humans and other animals.
keep reading
Image: An amphioxus (also called a lancelet), which is a very distant cousin to humans and other vertebrates. It is the creature most similar to the original spineless organism that existed before a major genomic event occurred. Credit: Carol MacKintosh

I wish internet articles were required to list their sources (in detail) because I’d like to read more about this.

discoverynews:

500 Million-Year-Old ‘Mistake’ Led to Humans

A spineless creature experienced two doublings in DNA, triggering the evolution of humans and other animals.

keep reading

Image: An amphioxus (also called a lancelet), which is a very distant cousin to humans and other vertebrates. It is the creature most similar to the original spineless organism that existed before a major genomic event occurred. Credit: Carol MacKintosh

I wish internet articles were required to list their sources (in detail) because I’d like to read more about this.

#news   #science   #evolution   #humans   #animals   #nature   #vertebrate   #invertebrates  

baby-vegan:

supervegan:

The Superior Human?

“The Superior Human?” is the first documentary to systematically challenge the common human belief that humans are superior to other life forms. The documentary reveals the absurdity of this belief while exploding human bias.

This is amazing.

(via radicalvegans)

#documentary   #film   #humans   #animal rights   #superior   #life   #biology   #queue  

rhizombie:

viabicycle:

Derrida on “The Animal”

“The gaze called animal offers to my sight the abyssal limit of the human: the inhuman or the human, the ends of man, that is to say the border crossing from which vantage man dares to announce himself to himself, thereby calling himself by the name that he believes he gives himself. And in these moments of nakedness, under the gaze of the animal, everything can happen to me, I am like a child ready for the apocalypse. I am (following) the apocalypse itself, that is to say the ultimate and first event of the end, the unveiling and the verdict.”

(Source: yrethra, via mohandasgandhi)

#quote   #derrida   #the animal   #animals   #nature   #humans   #non-human people   #non-human animals   #species   #life   #queue  

No one is illegal.

No one is illegal.

(via ratsandcandy666)

did-you-kno:

Source

that’s a lot. 

did-you-kno:

Source

that’s a lot. 

(via did-you-kno)

#population   #humans   #earth  
mohandasgandhi:

Whales Are People Too

ONE OF THE MOST important features of science is that  scientific progress regularly leads to important ethical questions. This  is particularly true with research about cetaceans — whales, dolphins  and the like — because it has become increasingly apparent that the  inner life of these nonhumans is more complex than most humans realise.  We have learned that their capacity for suffering is significantly  greater than has been imagined—which makes much human behavior towards  these nonhumans ethically problematic.
There is now ample scientific evidence that capacities once thought  to be unique to humans are shared by these beings. Like humans, whales  and dolphins are ‘persons’. That is, they are self-aware beings with  individual personalities and a rich inner life. They have the ability to  think abstractly, feel deeply and choose their actions. Their lives are  characterized by close, long-term relationships with conspecifics in  communities characterized by culture. In short, whales and dolphins are a  who, not a what.
However, as the saying goes, there is good news and there is bad news.
The good news is that the scientific community is gradually  recognising the importance of these ethical issues. For example, more  marine mammal scientists are steering away from doing research on  captive dolphins. More significantly, a small group of experts who met  at the Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies in the spring of 2010 to  evaluate the ethical implications of the scientific research on  cetaceans concluded that the evidence merited issuing a Declaration of  Rights for Cetaceans: Whales and Dolphins. This group included such  prominent scientists as Lori Marino and Hal Whitehead. Particularly  important in this declaration was the recognition that whales and  dolphins are persons who are “beyond use”. Treating them as ‘property’  is indefensible.
Unfortunately, while there has been consistent progress in  scientists’ sensitivity to the ethical issues, the same cannot be said  for those who use cetaceans to generate revenue.
In contrast to the considerable detail devoted to virtually every  aspect of dolphin anatomy, physiology and behavior on the US  SeaWorld/Busch Gardens Animals website,  the discussion of intelligence is so brief and ignores so much  scientific evidence that it comes off as a self-serving dodge: “Rating  the intelligence of different animals is misleading and extremely  subjective”.
Even if this statement is true, it does not explain why no mention is  made of research that shows dolphins’ impressive cognitive abilities:  to pass mirror self-recognition tests (Lori Marino and Diana Reiss); to  comprehend artificial human language (Lou Herman); and to solve problems  by advanced planning (John Gory and Stan Kuczaj). The bibliography  offered contains nothing more recent than 2003 and, not surprisingly,  omits any research that indicates the intellectual and emotional  sophistication of these cetaceans.
To its credit, the website of the Vancouver Aquarium notes,  “Studies of numerous species of dolphins have shown evidence of high  levels of intelligence, including complex social behaviour, detailed  memory, self-recognition, and the ability to learn rudimentary  symbol-based artificial codes.” However, notably absent from this or any  other site connected with a captive facility is any full discussion of  the ethical implications of these facts.
Especially troubling is the failure of the industry to respond to the  scientific discoveries at issue with any serious re-evaluation of their  practices. One of the most important ethical implications of the  scientific research on cetaceans is that these individuals are  ‘persons’, not ‘property’. Yet captive facilities continue to offer  scientifically flawed and ethically unsophisticated defenses for their  current practices. Virtually no consideration is given to the ethical  status of their captive breeding programs. Treating self-aware beings as  a commodity whose reproduction is managed for economic advantage is, no  matter what benefit it produces, fundamentally offensive from an  ethical standpoint.
It is, of course, no surprise that the managers, employees and  researchers affiliated with enterprises that make money using captive  whales and dolphins do a poor job of being sensitive to the ethical  implications of the progress of marine mammal science. These people are  caught in a classic conflict of interest. On the one hand, they have a  duty to protect the welfare of the cetaceans in their care. On the other  hand, their jobs and careers depend on keeping the current business  model intact for as long as they can.
Predictably, when there’s money on the line, people will not only  rationalise all sorts of actions, they’ll even believe their own  rationalisations. As we saw with the 2008 economic meltdown, individuals  running banks and financial institutions on Wall Street were so blinded  by a desire to maximise profits that they not only ran their own  companies into the ground, they put the economy of the entire planet at  risk. When we humans are so ready to turn a blind eye to actions that  risk hurting ourselves for the sake of profit, it comes as no surprise  that we’ll readily ignore the possibility of hurting other intelligent  species.
All of the organisations that use captive cetaceans say they are  strongly committed to the welfare of the whales and dolphins under their  care. Given the ethical challenges that have come from the progress of  scientific research over the last 30 years, the question is whether  these organisations will respond appropriately on their own or whether  they will increasingly become the targets of controversy and consumer  boycotts.
The ultimate irony in this situation is that—as was the case with the  Wall Street banks that were sunk by greed and poor business  judgment—the business model in place at the companies that make money  from captivity is not even the best one to maximise profits. The  progress of marine mammal science combined with the activities of  cetacean advocacy groups will increasingly cast these operations in an  ethically questionable light with consumers. At the very least, these  facilities will have to expend money just to keep their customer base.  More importantly, the primacy of technology in the lives of young people  provides these operations with a perfect opportunity to move away from  the enormous ongoing costs connected with maintaining live whales and  dolphins. Sophisticated multi-media (HD, 3D, IMAX) presentations would  not only be more scientifically accurate, more interesting and more  acceptable from an ethical perspective than live display, they would  also be vastly more profitable over the long term.
We are left, then, with an interesting—but troubling—conundrum. If  moving away from using captive whales and dolphins is both the right  thing to do and more profitable than current practices, why isn’t it  happening?

[Image via]

mohandasgandhi:

Whales Are People Too

ONE OF THE MOST important features of science is that scientific progress regularly leads to important ethical questions. This is particularly true with research about cetaceans — whales, dolphins and the like — because it has become increasingly apparent that the inner life of these nonhumans is more complex than most humans realise. We have learned that their capacity for suffering is significantly greater than has been imagined—which makes much human behavior towards these nonhumans ethically problematic.

There is now ample scientific evidence that capacities once thought to be unique to humans are shared by these beings. Like humans, whales and dolphins are ‘persons’. That is, they are self-aware beings with individual personalities and a rich inner life. They have the ability to think abstractly, feel deeply and choose their actions. Their lives are characterized by close, long-term relationships with conspecifics in communities characterized by culture. In short, whales and dolphins are a who, not a what.

However, as the saying goes, there is good news and there is bad news.

The good news is that the scientific community is gradually recognising the importance of these ethical issues. For example, more marine mammal scientists are steering away from doing research on captive dolphins. More significantly, a small group of experts who met at the Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies in the spring of 2010 to evaluate the ethical implications of the scientific research on cetaceans concluded that the evidence merited issuing a Declaration of Rights for Cetaceans: Whales and Dolphins. This group included such prominent scientists as Lori Marino and Hal Whitehead. Particularly important in this declaration was the recognition that whales and dolphins are persons who are “beyond use”. Treating them as ‘property’ is indefensible.

Unfortunately, while there has been consistent progress in scientists’ sensitivity to the ethical issues, the same cannot be said for those who use cetaceans to generate revenue.

In contrast to the considerable detail devoted to virtually every aspect of dolphin anatomy, physiology and behavior on the US SeaWorld/Busch Gardens Animals website, the discussion of intelligence is so brief and ignores so much scientific evidence that it comes off as a self-serving dodge: “Rating the intelligence of different animals is misleading and extremely subjective”.

Even if this statement is true, it does not explain why no mention is made of research that shows dolphins’ impressive cognitive abilities: to pass mirror self-recognition tests (Lori Marino and Diana Reiss); to comprehend artificial human language (Lou Herman); and to solve problems by advanced planning (John Gory and Stan Kuczaj). The bibliography offered contains nothing more recent than 2003 and, not surprisingly, omits any research that indicates the intellectual and emotional sophistication of these cetaceans.

To its credit, the website of the Vancouver Aquarium notes, “Studies of numerous species of dolphins have shown evidence of high levels of intelligence, including complex social behaviour, detailed memory, self-recognition, and the ability to learn rudimentary symbol-based artificial codes.” However, notably absent from this or any other site connected with a captive facility is any full discussion of the ethical implications of these facts.

Especially troubling is the failure of the industry to respond to the scientific discoveries at issue with any serious re-evaluation of their practices. One of the most important ethical implications of the scientific research on cetaceans is that these individuals are ‘persons’, not ‘property’. Yet captive facilities continue to offer scientifically flawed and ethically unsophisticated defenses for their current practices. Virtually no consideration is given to the ethical status of their captive breeding programs. Treating self-aware beings as a commodity whose reproduction is managed for economic advantage is, no matter what benefit it produces, fundamentally offensive from an ethical standpoint.

It is, of course, no surprise that the managers, employees and researchers affiliated with enterprises that make money using captive whales and dolphins do a poor job of being sensitive to the ethical implications of the progress of marine mammal science. These people are caught in a classic conflict of interest. On the one hand, they have a duty to protect the welfare of the cetaceans in their care. On the other hand, their jobs and careers depend on keeping the current business model intact for as long as they can.

Predictably, when there’s money on the line, people will not only rationalise all sorts of actions, they’ll even believe their own rationalisations. As we saw with the 2008 economic meltdown, individuals running banks and financial institutions on Wall Street were so blinded by a desire to maximise profits that they not only ran their own companies into the ground, they put the economy of the entire planet at risk. When we humans are so ready to turn a blind eye to actions that risk hurting ourselves for the sake of profit, it comes as no surprise that we’ll readily ignore the possibility of hurting other intelligent species.

All of the organisations that use captive cetaceans say they are strongly committed to the welfare of the whales and dolphins under their care. Given the ethical challenges that have come from the progress of scientific research over the last 30 years, the question is whether these organisations will respond appropriately on their own or whether they will increasingly become the targets of controversy and consumer boycotts.

The ultimate irony in this situation is that—as was the case with the Wall Street banks that were sunk by greed and poor business judgment—the business model in place at the companies that make money from captivity is not even the best one to maximise profits. The progress of marine mammal science combined with the activities of cetacean advocacy groups will increasingly cast these operations in an ethically questionable light with consumers. At the very least, these facilities will have to expend money just to keep their customer base. More importantly, the primacy of technology in the lives of young people provides these operations with a perfect opportunity to move away from the enormous ongoing costs connected with maintaining live whales and dolphins. Sophisticated multi-media (HD, 3D, IMAX) presentations would not only be more scientifically accurate, more interesting and more acceptable from an ethical perspective than live display, they would also be vastly more profitable over the long term.

We are left, then, with an interesting—but troubling—conundrum. If moving away from using captive whales and dolphins is both the right thing to do and more profitable than current practices, why isn’t it happening?

[Image via]

mothernaturenetwork:

Undetonated land mines are a serious form of pollution that leaves large geographical areas virtually uninhabitable and injures or kills thousands each year. That’s why locating and removing them from former war zones is so important. Trouble is that few human volunteers are willing to risk their lives to uncover them. Enter the rat brigade, specifically, African giant pouched rats.These fast-learning rodents, dubbed HeroRATs — which are too light to set off land mines — are being trained to sniff out buried explosives. The group is also training rats to locate people buried under rubble from natural disasters, as well as detect leaking gas lines and even the presence of tuberculosis in human sputum samples.
8 animals helping humans save the planet

mothernaturenetwork:

Undetonated land mines are a serious form of pollution that leaves large geographical areas virtually uninhabitable and injures or kills thousands each year. That’s why locating and removing them from former war zones is so important. Trouble is that few human volunteers are willing to risk their lives to uncover them. Enter the rat brigade, specifically, African giant pouched rats.

These fast-learning rodents, dubbed HeroRATs — which are too light to set off land mines — are being trained to sniff out buried explosives. The group is also training rats to locate people buried under rubble from natural disasters, as well as detect leaking gas lines and even the presence of tuberculosis in human sputum samples.

8 animals helping humans save the planet

#animals   #relationship   #humans  

canisfamiliaris:

We are a cooperative ape, and a fair one. We work together to put food on the table and once it’s there, social rules compel us to share it around equitably. These two actions are tied to one another. In a new study, Katharina Hamann from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology has shown that three-year-old children are more likely to fairly divide their spoils with other kids if they’ve worked together to get them. The same can’t be said of chimpanzees, one of our closest relatives. Sharing comes less naturally to them, and it doesn’t become any more likely if they’ve worked together to get a meal.

#animals   #humans   #children   #chimpanzees   #cooperation  
canisfamiliaris:

National Geographic has produced a 4-page map that lays income levels on top of world populations. In a glance you can see where humans live on earth and at what wealth level. Click the graphic.
(via Where and on how much money the world lives ‐ Covestor)

canisfamiliaris:

National Geographic has produced a 4-page map that lays income levels on top of world populations. In a glance you can see where humans live on earth and at what wealth level. Click the graphic.

(via Where and on how much money the world lives ‐ Covestor)

#global   #economy   #money   #wealth   #humans   #national geographic