Suzanna. In love with a schnauzer named Mimzy. Instagram
mothernaturenetwork:

Desert locusts thriving after fall of GadhafiA lack of organize pest control operations in Libya has put not only its own farms at risk, but the farms of nearby countries as well.

mothernaturenetwork:

Desert locusts thriving after fall of Gadhafi
A lack of organize pest control operations in Libya has put not only its own farms at risk, but the farms of nearby countries as well.

#libya   #locust   #pest   #pest control   #farm   #agriculture   #queue  
earth-song:

Akakos Region at Libyan Great Desert. by Bashar Shglila

earth-song:

Akakos Region at Libyan Great Desert. by Bashar Shglila

(via visible-universe)

#sunset   #desert   #libya   #landscape   #travel  
thepoliticalnotebook:

This is the photograph for which Rémi Ochlik, the 28-year-old French photojournalist killed in Homs this morning, won first prize in the general news category of this year’s World Press Photo awards. Taken in Ras Lanuf, Libya, it shows a revolutionary fighter resting in front of the flag.

thepoliticalnotebook:

This is the photograph for which Rémi Ochlik, the 28-year-old French photojournalist killed in Homs this morning, won first prize in the general news category of this year’s World Press Photo awards. Taken in Ras Lanuf, Libya, it shows a revolutionary fighter resting in front of the flag.

(via fotojournalismus)

#syria   #photojournalist   #death   #violence   #warfare   #homs   #remi ochlik   #libya  
fotojournalismus:

Exodus From Libya
Photojournalist Chris de Bode has photographed an exodus, a line of people on the move from a place in which they could no longer stay to a destination unknown or even nonexistent. To cover the spectacle of the mass departure of Bangladeshi migrant workers from Libya, he took nearly 500 photos in a single day and found an artistic strategy that utilized the repetition and relentlessness that characterized his imagery of the human train. 
(via Foam Magazine) 
The Video of Libyan Exodus
Over the past five years or so, more and more still photographers are expanding their repertoires to include motion based work. This video, co-produced by Panos Picture Agency and photographer Chris de Bode is an example of a photographer making use of still images within the video format.
Chris de Bode:

 “I went on assignment for the Dutch Refugee Foundation, to the Libyan border in Tunisia and witnessed on the 4th of March an exodus of people fleeing the war in Libya. There were a lot of photographers working there. I wondered what I could add to all the pics made that day. I decided to stand still like a tripod shooting all people passing by and recorded the sound of the rolling wheels from suitcases, passing cars and footsteps. That same night I made a collage of 81 pictures which was published in various newspapers. I could do a small movie later. Later I realized that the whole event could be used as a metaphor for all people in the world fleeing violence, disaster etc….”

Here is the link of the video, check it out!
(via The Wall Street Journal)

fotojournalismus:

Exodus From Libya

Photojournalist Chris de Bode has photographed an exodus, a line of people on the move from a place in which they could no longer stay to a destination unknown or even nonexistent. To cover the spectacle of the mass departure of Bangladeshi migrant workers from Libya, he took nearly 500 photos in a single day and found an artistic strategy that utilized the repetition and relentlessness that characterized his imagery of the human train.

(via Foam Magazine)

The Video of Libyan Exodus

Over the past five years or so, more and more still photographers are expanding their repertoires to include motion based work. This video, co-produced by Panos Picture Agency and photographer Chris de Bode is an example of a photographer making use of still images within the video format.

Chris de Bode:

I went on assignment for the Dutch Refugee Foundation, to the Libyan border in Tunisia and witnessed on the 4th of March an exodus of people fleeing the war in Libya. There were a lot of photographers working there. I wondered what I could add to all the pics made that day. I decided to stand still like a tripod shooting all people passing by and recorded the sound of the rolling wheels from suitcases, passing cars and footsteps. That same night I made a collage of 81 pictures which was published in various newspapers. I could do a small movie later. Later I realized that the whole event could be used as a metaphor for all people in the world fleeing violence, disaster etc….

Here is the link of the video, check it out!

(via The Wall Street Journal)

#libya   #exodus   #africa   #history   #politics   #war  
thepoliticalnotebook:

Conflict interactive for Libya. The AP has an awesome interactive graphic that lets you track the progress of the revolution from February 20th until today, as well as providing info on refugee numbers, NATO airbases, international reactions, the history of Gaddhafi’s rule, and other important info. It’s basically everything you ever wanted to know about the past six months of war in Libya in one clean, appealing highly-interactive visual. 

thepoliticalnotebook:

Conflict interactive for Libya. The AP has an awesome interactive graphic that lets you track the progress of the revolution from February 20th until today, as well as providing info on refugee numbers, NATO airbases, international reactions, the history of Gaddhafi’s rule, and other important info. It’s basically everything you ever wanted to know about the past six months of war in Libya in one clean, appealing highly-interactive visual. 

(via superchloe)

#libya   #news   #tripoli   #politics   #human rights   #international  
kilele:

Fireworks explode as people gather near the  courthouse in Benghazi, on August 22, 2011 to celebrate the entry of  rebel fighters into Tripoli. Jubilant rebel fighters streamed into the  heart of Tripoli as Muammar Qaddafi’s forces collapsed and crowds took  to the streets to celebrate, tearing down posters of the Libyan leader.  
Photo by Reuters/Esam Al-Fetori via In Focus

kilele:

Fireworks explode as people gather near the courthouse in Benghazi, on August 22, 2011 to celebrate the entry of rebel fighters into Tripoli. Jubilant rebel fighters streamed into the heart of Tripoli as Muammar Qaddafi’s forces collapsed and crowds took to the streets to celebrate, tearing down posters of the Libyan leader.  

Photo by Reuters/Esam Al-Fetori via In Focus

(via galdikas-deactivated20121116)

#libya   #politics   #middle east   #tripoli   #Gaddafi  
Perspective

Perspective

#riots   #vancouver   #egypt   #libya   #somalia  
lady-lutra:

British journalist Tim Hetherington dies in Libya
A British journalist has been killed while covering the conflict in the besieged Libyan city of Misrata.
Tim Hetherington, co-director of Oscar-nominated documentary  Restrepo, reportedly died in a mortar attack, which injured three other  journalists.

lady-lutra:

British journalist Tim Hetherington dies in Libya

A British journalist has been killed while covering the conflict in the besieged Libyan city of Misrata.

Tim Hetherington, co-director of Oscar-nominated documentary Restrepo, reportedly died in a mortar attack, which injured three other journalists.

#tim hetherington   #libya   #journalist   #british   #misrata   #restrepo   #documentary   #death   #rip   #violence   #middle east  

canisfamiliaris:

The Arab League called on the United Nations Security Council to impose a no-fly zone over Libya to stop air attacks by forces loyal to Muammar Qaddafi, Egyptian state television reported.

(Source: inothernews)

#arab league   #UN   #united nations   #no-fly zone   #military   #war   #libya   #qaddafi  
Just because you can’t do everything doesn’t mean you shouldn’t do anything.

Just because you can’t do everything doesn’t mean you shouldn’t do anything.

(Source: guineveresbewbs, via daelio)

#quote   #libya   #war  

abudai:

    1. INFORM PEOPLE - Write op-eds and letters to the editor to your local newspapers. Blog about it. Use twitter, include #Libya hashtag. 
    2. SUPPORT NEWS MEDIA THAT IS DOING COVERAGE OF LIBYA - CLICK CLICK CLICK on news articles! And comment on them! And share them on Facebook, on Twitter, on Tumblr. This is how news media thrives. It’s a sad reality, but clicks and comments encourage editors to cover a stort more. Tweet “Thanks” to Anderson Cooper, AlJazeera, etc. Send them thank you letters.
    3. SIGN THESE PETITIONS: BP, Pull out of Libya now! (Change.org); Sanctions to stop Libya crackdowns (Change.org); Send help to Libya! (PetitionOnline)
    4. GO TO LOCAL SOLIDARITY PROTESTS - The Libyan people think no one outside cares about them. Sending them photos and videos of supporters would bring up morale. If there are no protests planned for your city, plan one! Stage one in your University’s free speech zones! 
    5. DISSEMINATE ONLINE RESOURCES - There is a lot of helpful, crowd-sourced material online right now. Like this crowd-sourced list of the dead. Or this number for free unmonitored Internet. Or even these instructions on how to control bleeding of a wound
    6. MIRROR VIDEOS - Many videos are being taken down- especially Facebook videos. If you know how to, mirror the video, upload it yourself. 
    7. TRANSLATE - If you know Arabic, help translate things like tweets, videos, audio, etc. The more people this information is accessible to, the better. 
    8. CONTACT YOUR LOCAL STATESMEN AND WOMEN - Tell them you want the U.S. to acknowledge what’s happening in Libya. Tell them you want them to call for the resignation of Gaddafi. Tell them you want them to send aid to Libya. Tell them to support freedom. Tell them to support democracy. Tell them to freaking CONDEMN THIS MASSACRE. Look here and here.
    9. SEND AID - Muslims Without Borders is organizing a medical convoy from Alexandria, Egypt to Libya. Send them money “earmarked” for Libya.  

(via rightsandhumanity)

#libya   #protest   #revolution  
sunshineandscrewdrivers:


You see that bullet?
It belongs to a .50 caliber.
You know how many inches it is?
About 5.
You know who’s taking the hits?
Libyans.
Do you know how much of an impact this is on a person’s body?
It tears them apart.
Gaddafi you are a terrible, terrible man.  Subhan’Allah.  Words cannot express how I and many others feel about you right now.

I am going to reblog every single image of this ammunition because it should never, ever, ever be used on a human being. PERIOD.

These are used in America to shoot through walls and stopping vehicles. They were not designed for use on humans. And that sick fuck is using them on civilians. On his people.

sunshineandscrewdrivers:

You see that bullet?

It belongs to a .50 caliber.

You know how many inches it is?

About 5.

You know who’s taking the hits?

Libyans.

Do you know how much of an impact this is on a person’s body?

It tears them apart.

Gaddafi you are a terrible, terrible man.  Subhan’Allah.  Words cannot express how I and many others feel about you right now.

I am going to reblog every single image of this ammunition because it should never, ever, ever be used on a human being. PERIOD.

These are used in America to shoot through walls and stopping vehicles. They were not designed for use on humans. And that sick fuck is using them on civilians. On his people.

(via galdikas-deactivated20121116)

#libya   #africa   #gaddafi   #shells   #weapons   #gun   #shelling   #bullets  
infraredmascara:

REBLOG!!!!!

infraredmascara:

REBLOG!!!!!

(via daelio)

#libya   #genocide   #liberation   #massacre   #weapons   #death   #so fucking scary   #quote