Suzanna. Instagram

Lost on my way to life.

I collect postcards and would love to do a postcard exchange with each and every one of my followers.

Also, I love ducks.
climateadaptation:

What if everyone lived like the UAE?

“if all 7 billion of the earth’s population lived like the way we do here in the UAE we would need a whopping 5.4 times more land than we currently have on Earth.”

Via KippReport

climateadaptation:

What if everyone lived like the UAE?

“if all 7 billion of the earth’s population lived like the way we do here in the UAE we would need a whopping 5.4 times more land than we currently have on Earth.”

Via KippReport

it-sfullofstars:

Liesegang banding in sandstone, Petra, Jordan

(via geologyrocks)

#geology   #petra   #rocks   #science   #art   #jordan   #middle east   #queue  
mohandasgandhi:

kaliem:

Syrian security inspect the site of an explosion  in Syria’s northern city of Aleppo February 10, 2012, in this handout  photograph released by Syria’s national news agency SANA. Twin bomb  blasts hit Syrian military and security buildings in Aleppo on Friday,  killing 25 people in the worst violence to hit the country’s commercial  hub in the 11-month uprising against President Bashar al-Assad. REUTERS/SANA/Handout 

This is a pretty unbelievable picture.

mohandasgandhi:

kaliem:

Syrian security inspect the site of an explosion in Syria’s northern city of Aleppo February 10, 2012, in this handout photograph released by Syria’s national news agency SANA. Twin bomb blasts hit Syrian military and security buildings in Aleppo on Friday, killing 25 people in the worst violence to hit the country’s commercial hub in the 11-month uprising against President Bashar al-Assad. REUTERS/SANA/Handout

This is a pretty unbelievable picture.

#syria   #war   #middle east   #conflict   #politics  
fotojournalismus:

A man walks in a neighborhood destroyed during recent fighting between government forces and Shi’ite rebels in the northwestern Yemeni city of Saada February 5, 2012. Saada has been the scene of several waves of battles between the national army and Shi’ite rebels in recent years.
[Credit : Khaled Abdullah/Reuters]

fotojournalismus:

A man walks in a neighborhood destroyed during recent fighting between government forces and Shi’ite rebels in the northwestern Yemeni city of Saada February 5, 2012. Saada has been the scene of several waves of battles between the national army and Shi’ite rebels in recent years.

[Credit : Khaled Abdullah/Reuters]

#yemen   #government   #religion   #war   #warfare   #middle east  
fotojournalismus:

People stand at the site of the suicide bombing, Damascus, Syria on December 23, 2011. Two massive explosions have rocked the centre of the Syrian capital, Damascus, killing at least 30 people and injuring 100. It was unclear who was responsible for the devastating car bombings, apparently set off by twin suicide bombers outside the offices of Syria’s security and intelligence agencies. They came just hours after a delegation of observers from the Arab League arrived in the country.
Guardian’s Live Blog|Al Jazeera’s Live Blog
[Credit : Muzaffar Salman/AP]

fotojournalismus:

People stand at the site of the suicide bombing, Damascus, Syria on December 23, 2011. Two massive explosions have rocked the centre of the Syrian capital, Damascus, killing at least 30 people and injuring 100. It was unclear who was responsible for the devastating car bombings, apparently set off by twin suicide bombers outside the offices of Syria’s security and intelligence agencies. They came just hours after a delegation of observers from the Arab League arrived in the country.

Guardian’s Live Blog|Al Jazeera’s Live Blog

[Credit : Muzaffar Salman/AP]

#syria   #politics   #news   #middle east   #arab spring   #bomb   #suicide bomb  

caraobrien:

promotingpeace:

The basics: Syria is an Arab country with more than 22 million people; it borders many of the major players in the Middle East (Israel, Lebanon, Iraq, Jordan, Turkey) and is roughly the size of North Dakota. Syria famously lost the Golan Heights to Israel in 1967, during the Arab-Israeli war; negotiations between the two countries have been minimal in recent years. Like many countries in the region, Syria’s main export is oil. Unlike Saudi Arabia or Iran, however, Syria’s oil reserves are relatively small; it ranks 33rd in the world. Syria is home to a smorgasbord of ethnicities and religions: Arabs, Kurds, Christians, Sunnis, Alawites, and Druze. The capital, Damascus, is a bustling metropolis (many believe it to be the oldest continuously inhabited city in the world) but is not the site of the country’s most significant protests. That city, Hama, is the country’s fourth-largest, with fewer than one million occupants.

Who’s in charge?: Bashar al-Assad has ruled Syria since 2000. His father, Hafez al-Assad, a member of the Ba’ath Party, came to power in 1970 after leading a bloodless coup. Hafez Assad’s family came from a minority religious sect: the Alawites, an offshoot of Shia Islam. In 1982, Hafez Assad ordered one of the most brutal massacres in the recent history of the Middle East: His troops killed nearly 20,000 people in—interestingly—the city of Hama. In 2000, Hafez Assad died, and Bashar took over. To some, the shift from Hafez to Bashar suggested an opportunity (albeit limited) for Syria to become a more moderate country. Eleven years later, it seems Bashar is intent on following in his father’s footsteps. Of course, Vogue magazine, in its recent profile of first-lady Asma Assad, did say that Syria is “the safest country in the Middle East.” So, that’s something. 

What’s happening? Since March, Syrians, especially those in Hama, have intermittently protested the Assad government. During the first week of August—which this year coincided with Ramadan, the holiest time in Islam—the Syrian army began a brutal campaign to control Hama, killing citizens in a seemingly indiscriminately manner. “People are being slaughtered like sheep while walking in the street,” one resident of Hama told the AP on August 4. Reports of the number of Syrians killed in Hama in the first week of August alone range from around 200 to 300 or more. On August 7, the Syrian army expanded its assault on protesters by reportedly killing 55 people in two other cities: Deir al-Zour and Houleh

What is the rest of the world doing about this? On August 4th, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said that the United States believed that 2,000 Syrians had already died at the hands of the Assad government. The UN Security Council issued a statement saying it condemned the Syrian government’s “widespread violations of human rights and the use of force against civilians.” The United States, Germany, and France have recently discussed potential measures “to pressure the Assad regime and support the Syrian people.” Syria has also faced serious criticism from its neighbors in the Middle East. Turkey, a country that maintains deep economic ties with Syria, has repeatedly condemned Assad’s violence toward protesters. Elsewhere, Saudi Arabia recently recalled its ambassador from Syria. In a speech on August 7, Saudi Arabia’s leader, King Abdullah, said, “What is happening in Syria is not acceptable for Saudi Arabia.” The Arab League, on the other hand, still holds out hope for the Assad regime. The group has called for an end to the Assad government’s assault against protesters, but in the same statement, Nabil al-Arabi, the organization’s secretary-general, said “The chance is still available for fulfilling the reforms.” 

How does this affect the United States? “It is no exaggeration to say that Syria holds the key for nearly all of America’s foreign policy goals in the Middle East,” says Reza Aslan, a professor at the University of California-Riverside and an expert on the region. “As Syria goes, so goes the region,” he adds. For years now, Syria has been an ally of several major US enemies in the region. Iran uses Syria to funnel weapons and resources to Hezbollah, the Shiite militia that dominates most of southern Lebanon. Without a strong relationship with Syria, Iran’s loss is twofold: a loss of influence on Israel and Lebanon via Hezbollah and a chink in the armor of its “influence” in the Arab world. Syria itself maintains political clout in Lebanon, too; it occupied the country until 2005. Syria also shares a key border with Israel. So far, efforts at influencing Assad have been fruitless. Visits from key US figures and the reopening of an embassy in Damascus have done little to move Syria toward reform.

So what should the United States do? Robert Danin, a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, favors a two-pronged approach: First, “assemble a contact group, similar to the one that has been formed to deal with Libya” and then “target sanctions specifically at key members of the regime that have been involved violence against the Syrian people.” But does the United States really have that much influence? “We should not exaggerate significance or impact [of the United States], which is marginal,” Marc Lynch, a professor at George Washington University, has warned. “Unilateral oil sanctions will have limited effect. Magic words don’t work.”

How do I follow what’s happening in real time? For keeping up with what’s happening in Syria—as well as most stories unfolding in the Middle East—it’s a good idea to follow the Twitter feed of Blake Hounshell, Foreign Policy’s managing editor. Ahmed Al Omran, the author of the Saudi blog Saudi Jeans, and Borzou Daragahi, the Middle East reporter for the Los Angeles Times, are also good Syria tweeps. The hashtags to follow are #RamadanMassacre and #Syria. Al-Jazeera English, the New York Times, and the Guardian’sconstantly updated Middle East blog all provide good, up-to-date information on the situation in Syria too.

This is excellent. 

(I wrote up something similar a while back with more on history and human rights, for those looking for more sources.)

#syria   #politics   #middle east   #arab spring   #news  
mothernaturenetwork:

Cities that have stood the test of time have more than just the scars of history; they show the influence — positive and negative — of human civilization.12 oldest continuously inhabited cities

mothernaturenetwork:

Cities that have stood the test of time have more than just the scars of history; they show the influence — positive and negative — of human civilization.
12 oldest continuously inhabited cities

#cities   #history   #photos   #archaeology   #time   #travel   #civilization   #syria   #west bank   #middle east   #near east   #greece   #bulgaria   #lebanon   #iran   #israel   #china   #india  
kilele:

Fireworks explode as people gather near the  courthouse in Benghazi, on August 22, 2011 to celebrate the entry of  rebel fighters into Tripoli. Jubilant rebel fighters streamed into the  heart of Tripoli as Muammar Qaddafi’s forces collapsed and crowds took  to the streets to celebrate, tearing down posters of the Libyan leader.  
Photo by Reuters/Esam Al-Fetori via In Focus

kilele:

Fireworks explode as people gather near the courthouse in Benghazi, on August 22, 2011 to celebrate the entry of rebel fighters into Tripoli. Jubilant rebel fighters streamed into the heart of Tripoli as Muammar Qaddafi’s forces collapsed and crowds took to the streets to celebrate, tearing down posters of the Libyan leader.  

Photo by Reuters/Esam Al-Fetori via In Focus

(via galdikas-deactivated20121116)

#libya   #politics   #middle east   #tripoli   #Gaddafi  

lotus-eyes:

promotingpeace

UNICEF, the UN children’s agency, says that Afghanistan is the worst place in the world to be a child. One in five children do not live past the age of five.  Most of those deaths are caused by curable childhood diseases and malnutrition, compounded by the security situation, which means that parents are unable to access proper health care. It is estimated that at least 30% of children from five to fourteen work to help their families survive.  Many weave rugs and work at factories making bricks. “It is very difficult to put a hard and fast figure to the number of children dying from hypothermia alone on Kabul’s streets as there would undoubtedly be other reasons that would make them sick or vulnerable in the first place,” UNICEF regional communications chief Sarah Crowe wrote. No one growing up in Afghanistan has ever known what it is like to live in a country at peace. During the ten years the Soviets were in Afghanistan, they killed one million Afghans.  Five million became refugees.

“Afghanistan today is without doubt the most dangerous place on earth to be born.” - Daniel Toole, UNICEF, Regional Director for South Asia    

“There are a lot of children in Afghanistan, but little childhood.” 
- Khaled Hosseini,  The Kite Runner

(via cornersoftheworld)

canisfamiliaris:

Iraq war memorial in Santa Monica, CA; by Kevin Dooley, CC BY 2.0

The costs of the wars in Afghanistan, Iraq, and Pakistan are estimated at 225,000 lives and up to $4 trillion in U.S. spending in a new report by scholars with the Eisenhower Research Project at Brown University’s Watson Institute for International Studies.

(Source: costsofwar.org)

#war   #afghanistan   #iran   #pakistan   #middle east   #economy   #politics   #lives   #death  
caraobrien:

Postcards from Hell, 2011: Images from the world’s most failed states
Rafael Sanchez Fabres/LatinContent/Getty Images
#failed states   #economy   #politics   #poverty   #somalia   #war   #famine   #chad   #africa   #sudan   #haiti   #latin america   #caribbean   #drc   #congo   #zimbabwe   #afghanistan   #middle east   #central african republic   #car   #Democratic Republic of Congo   #iraq   #ivory coast   #guinea   #pakistan   #yemen   #nigeria   #niger   #kenya   #birundi  
fuckyeaheyegasms:

The Gulf of Suez & Suez Canal (by sfxdonutz)
On the way to Madrid, we flew over the Gulf of Suez and Suez Canal in Egypt

fuckyeaheyegasms:

The Gulf of Suez & Suez Canal (by sfxdonutz)

On the way to Madrid, we flew over the Gulf of Suez and Suez Canal in Egypt

#suez canal   #earth   #satellite   #egypt   #africa   #gulf of suez   #middle east