Suzanna. In love with a schnauzer named Mimzy. Instagram

tatreezconsciousness:

hagereseb:

Teju Cole satire of the Washington Post article “9 questions about Syria you were too embarrassed to ask

M

amazing. and so horrible. 

(Source: rs620, via mohandasgandhi)

#syria   #wapo   #war   #warfare   #britain   #usa   #uk   #teju cole   #twitter   #tweets  

thepoliticalnotebook:

Today is the anniversary of the beginning of Syria’s revolution. So far eight to nine thousand people have been killed and countless wounded. 230,000 have fled their homes. The opposition has planned rallies to mark the day, although the Syrian army is bolstering its presence in opposition strongholds, making it difficult. Activist Adel El-Omari said: “It is clear that they have tightened the siege because they are worried about what people will do for the anniversary.”

One of the latest pieces of news out of Syria is the revelation of the contents of the Assads’ emails, as obtained by the Guardian. There are several thousand of them, revealing the Assads’ lives of casual luxury, ordering apps off iTunes while their country erupts.


Photos: Homs. Feb 15th. Satellite photo/APIdlib. Feb 26th. Rodrigo Abd/AP, Bab Tudmor, Homs. Feb 25th. Stringer/AFP, Idlib. March 10th. Rodrigo Abd/AP, Al-Qusayr. Feb 24th. Alessio Romenzi for TIME.

[Al Jazeera, AP, Guardian]

(via mohandasgandhi)

#syria   #homs   #revolutino   #warfare   #politics  
fotojournalismus:

A woman holds her daughter on the balcony of her building damaged by Syrian Army bombings in central Idlib, Feb. 27, 2012. More than 7,600 people have been killed in violence across Syria since anti-regime protests erupted in March 2011, according to the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights.
[Credit : Rodrigo Abd / AP]

fotojournalismus:

A woman holds her daughter on the balcony of her building damaged by Syrian Army bombings in central Idlib, Feb. 27, 2012. More than 7,600 people have been killed in violence across Syria since anti-regime protests erupted in March 2011, according to the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights.

[Credit : Rodrigo Abd / AP]

#syria   #war   #government   #politics   #human rights  
inothernews:

BORDERLAND   This satellite image shows a pipeline fire in Homs, Syria. The pipeline,  which runs through the rebel-held neighbourhood of Baba Amr, had been  shelled by regime troops for the previous 12 days, according to two  activist groups, the Local Coordination Committees and the Britain-based  Syrian Observatory for Human Rights. The state news agency, SANA,  blamed “armed terrorists” for the pipeline attack.  (Photo: Digital Globe / AP via the Telegraph)

inothernews:

BORDERLAND   This satellite image shows a pipeline fire in Homs, Syria. The pipeline, which runs through the rebel-held neighbourhood of Baba Amr, had been shelled by regime troops for the previous 12 days, according to two activist groups, the Local Coordination Committees and the Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights. The state news agency, SANA, blamed “armed terrorists” for the pipeline attack.  (Photo: Digital Globe / AP via the Telegraph)

(via therecipe)

#syria   #homs   #warfare   #pipeline   #terrorism  
I think the reports of my survival may be exaggerated. I’m in Babo Amr. Sickening, trying to understand how the world can stand by and I should be hardened by now. Watched a baby die today. Shrapnel, doctors could do nothing. His little tummy just heaved and heaved until it stopped. Feeling helpless. As well as cold! Will keep trying to get out the information.
Slain reporter Marie Colvin’s last dispatch, posted to a Facebook group for conflict journalists and rights reporters. She was killed this morning in a mortar attack. (via newsweek)

(via cheatsheet)

#quote   #marie colvin   #journalist   #syria  
thepoliticalnotebook:

This is the photograph for which Rémi Ochlik, the 28-year-old French photojournalist killed in Homs this morning, won first prize in the general news category of this year’s World Press Photo awards. Taken in Ras Lanuf, Libya, it shows a revolutionary fighter resting in front of the flag.

thepoliticalnotebook:

This is the photograph for which Rémi Ochlik, the 28-year-old French photojournalist killed in Homs this morning, won first prize in the general news category of this year’s World Press Photo awards. Taken in Ras Lanuf, Libya, it shows a revolutionary fighter resting in front of the flag.

(via fotojournalismus)

#syria   #photojournalist   #death   #violence   #warfare   #homs   #remi ochlik   #libya  
mohandasgandhi:

kaliem:

Syrian security inspect the site of an explosion  in Syria’s northern city of Aleppo February 10, 2012, in this handout  photograph released by Syria’s national news agency SANA. Twin bomb  blasts hit Syrian military and security buildings in Aleppo on Friday,  killing 25 people in the worst violence to hit the country’s commercial  hub in the 11-month uprising against President Bashar al-Assad. REUTERS/SANA/Handout 

This is a pretty unbelievable picture.

mohandasgandhi:

kaliem:

Syrian security inspect the site of an explosion in Syria’s northern city of Aleppo February 10, 2012, in this handout photograph released by Syria’s national news agency SANA. Twin bomb blasts hit Syrian military and security buildings in Aleppo on Friday, killing 25 people in the worst violence to hit the country’s commercial hub in the 11-month uprising against President Bashar al-Assad. REUTERS/SANA/Handout

This is a pretty unbelievable picture.

#syria   #war   #middle east   #conflict   #politics  
In Syria today, wounded patients and doctors are pursued, and risk torture and arrest at the hands of the security services. Medicine is being used as a weapon of persecution.
Marie-Pierre Allié, MSF president, on the Syrian regime’s campaign of unrelenting repression against people wounded in demonstrations and the medical workers trying to treat them. (via doctorswithoutborders)
#syria   #msf   #fuck  
reuters:

This Reuters graphic shows there have been 6,519 men, 190 women and 465 children killed in violence in Syria as of Feb. 5, 2012. The most fatalities in a single day since April of last year happened on Feb. 4, 2012 with 400 deaths reported.
The latest on Syria | Follow Reuters on Tumblr
[Graphic: REUTERS | Sources: UNITAR-UNOSAT, Syria Violence Document Center, syrianshuhada.com, syriamap.wordpress.com, news reports]

reuters:

This Reuters graphic shows there have been 6,519 men, 190 women and 465 children killed in violence in Syria as of Feb. 5, 2012. The most fatalities in a single day since April of last year happened on Feb. 4, 2012 with 400 deaths reported.

The latest on Syria | Follow Reuters on Tumblr

[Graphic: REUTERS | Sources: UNITAR-UNOSAT, Syria Violence Document Center, syrianshuhada.com, syriamap.wordpress.com, news reports]

(via mohandasgandhi)

#syria   #politics   #war   #crisis  
No government in the world kills its people, unless it’s led by a crazy person.
#quote   #bashar al-assad   #syria  
fotojournalismus:

People stand at the site of the suicide bombing, Damascus, Syria on December 23, 2011. Two massive explosions have rocked the centre of the Syrian capital, Damascus, killing at least 30 people and injuring 100. It was unclear who was responsible for the devastating car bombings, apparently set off by twin suicide bombers outside the offices of Syria’s security and intelligence agencies. They came just hours after a delegation of observers from the Arab League arrived in the country.
Guardian’s Live Blog|Al Jazeera’s Live Blog
[Credit : Muzaffar Salman/AP]

fotojournalismus:

People stand at the site of the suicide bombing, Damascus, Syria on December 23, 2011. Two massive explosions have rocked the centre of the Syrian capital, Damascus, killing at least 30 people and injuring 100. It was unclear who was responsible for the devastating car bombings, apparently set off by twin suicide bombers outside the offices of Syria’s security and intelligence agencies. They came just hours after a delegation of observers from the Arab League arrived in the country.

Guardian’s Live Blog|Al Jazeera’s Live Blog

[Credit : Muzaffar Salman/AP]

#syria   #politics   #news   #middle east   #arab spring   #bomb   #suicide bomb  

caraobrien:

promotingpeace:

The basics: Syria is an Arab country with more than 22 million people; it borders many of the major players in the Middle East (Israel, Lebanon, Iraq, Jordan, Turkey) and is roughly the size of North Dakota. Syria famously lost the Golan Heights to Israel in 1967, during the Arab-Israeli war; negotiations between the two countries have been minimal in recent years. Like many countries in the region, Syria’s main export is oil. Unlike Saudi Arabia or Iran, however, Syria’s oil reserves are relatively small; it ranks 33rd in the world. Syria is home to a smorgasbord of ethnicities and religions: Arabs, Kurds, Christians, Sunnis, Alawites, and Druze. The capital, Damascus, is a bustling metropolis (many believe it to be the oldest continuously inhabited city in the world) but is not the site of the country’s most significant protests. That city, Hama, is the country’s fourth-largest, with fewer than one million occupants.

Who’s in charge?: Bashar al-Assad has ruled Syria since 2000. His father, Hafez al-Assad, a member of the Ba’ath Party, came to power in 1970 after leading a bloodless coup. Hafez Assad’s family came from a minority religious sect: the Alawites, an offshoot of Shia Islam. In 1982, Hafez Assad ordered one of the most brutal massacres in the recent history of the Middle East: His troops killed nearly 20,000 people in—interestingly—the city of Hama. In 2000, Hafez Assad died, and Bashar took over. To some, the shift from Hafez to Bashar suggested an opportunity (albeit limited) for Syria to become a more moderate country. Eleven years later, it seems Bashar is intent on following in his father’s footsteps. Of course, Vogue magazine, in its recent profile of first-lady Asma Assad, did say that Syria is “the safest country in the Middle East.” So, that’s something. 

What’s happening? Since March, Syrians, especially those in Hama, have intermittently protested the Assad government. During the first week of August—which this year coincided with Ramadan, the holiest time in Islam—the Syrian army began a brutal campaign to control Hama, killing citizens in a seemingly indiscriminately manner. “People are being slaughtered like sheep while walking in the street,” one resident of Hama told the AP on August 4. Reports of the number of Syrians killed in Hama in the first week of August alone range from around 200 to 300 or more. On August 7, the Syrian army expanded its assault on protesters by reportedly killing 55 people in two other cities: Deir al-Zour and Houleh

What is the rest of the world doing about this? On August 4th, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said that the United States believed that 2,000 Syrians had already died at the hands of the Assad government. The UN Security Council issued a statement saying it condemned the Syrian government’s “widespread violations of human rights and the use of force against civilians.” The United States, Germany, and France have recently discussed potential measures “to pressure the Assad regime and support the Syrian people.” Syria has also faced serious criticism from its neighbors in the Middle East. Turkey, a country that maintains deep economic ties with Syria, has repeatedly condemned Assad’s violence toward protesters. Elsewhere, Saudi Arabia recently recalled its ambassador from Syria. In a speech on August 7, Saudi Arabia’s leader, King Abdullah, said, “What is happening in Syria is not acceptable for Saudi Arabia.” The Arab League, on the other hand, still holds out hope for the Assad regime. The group has called for an end to the Assad government’s assault against protesters, but in the same statement, Nabil al-Arabi, the organization’s secretary-general, said “The chance is still available for fulfilling the reforms.” 

How does this affect the United States? “It is no exaggeration to say that Syria holds the key for nearly all of America’s foreign policy goals in the Middle East,” says Reza Aslan, a professor at the University of California-Riverside and an expert on the region. “As Syria goes, so goes the region,” he adds. For years now, Syria has been an ally of several major US enemies in the region. Iran uses Syria to funnel weapons and resources to Hezbollah, the Shiite militia that dominates most of southern Lebanon. Without a strong relationship with Syria, Iran’s loss is twofold: a loss of influence on Israel and Lebanon via Hezbollah and a chink in the armor of its “influence” in the Arab world. Syria itself maintains political clout in Lebanon, too; it occupied the country until 2005. Syria also shares a key border with Israel. So far, efforts at influencing Assad have been fruitless. Visits from key US figures and the reopening of an embassy in Damascus have done little to move Syria toward reform.

So what should the United States do? Robert Danin, a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, favors a two-pronged approach: First, “assemble a contact group, similar to the one that has been formed to deal with Libya” and then “target sanctions specifically at key members of the regime that have been involved violence against the Syrian people.” But does the United States really have that much influence? “We should not exaggerate significance or impact [of the United States], which is marginal,” Marc Lynch, a professor at George Washington University, has warned. “Unilateral oil sanctions will have limited effect. Magic words don’t work.”

How do I follow what’s happening in real time? For keeping up with what’s happening in Syria—as well as most stories unfolding in the Middle East—it’s a good idea to follow the Twitter feed of Blake Hounshell, Foreign Policy’s managing editor. Ahmed Al Omran, the author of the Saudi blog Saudi Jeans, and Borzou Daragahi, the Middle East reporter for the Los Angeles Times, are also good Syria tweeps. The hashtags to follow are #RamadanMassacre and #Syria. Al-Jazeera English, the New York Times, and the Guardian’sconstantly updated Middle East blog all provide good, up-to-date information on the situation in Syria too.

This is excellent. 

(I wrote up something similar a while back with more on history and human rights, for those looking for more sources.)

#syria   #politics   #middle east   #arab spring   #news  
mothernaturenetwork:

Cities that have stood the test of time have more than just the scars of history; they show the influence — positive and negative — of human civilization.12 oldest continuously inhabited cities

mothernaturenetwork:

Cities that have stood the test of time have more than just the scars of history; they show the influence — positive and negative — of human civilization.
12 oldest continuously inhabited cities

#cities   #history   #photos   #archaeology   #time   #travel   #civilization   #syria   #west bank   #middle east   #near east   #greece   #bulgaria   #lebanon   #iran   #israel   #china   #india  
aljazeera:

Syria passes law to allow political parties | The concession by Assad to quell anti-government protests is blasted by opposition as symbolic and far too late.

aljazeera:

Syria passes law to allow political parties | The concession by Assad to quell anti-government protests is blasted by opposition as symbolic and far too late.

#al jazeera   #aljazeera   #syria   #news