Suzanna. In love with a schnauzer named Mimzy. Instagram
fotojournalismus:

Cam Lo, Quang Tri Province. Phan Thi Hoi bathes her 14-year-old son, Bui Quang Ky. She was exposed to Agent Orange when she was in the North Vietnamese Army during the war. Vietnam, 2004.  
[Credit : James Nachtwey] 
 In the 1960s, the United States blanketed the Mekong River delta with Agent Orange, a chemical defoliant more devastating than napalm. Thirty years after the end of the Vietnam War, the chemical is still poisoning the water and coursing through the blood of a third generation. From Ho Chi Minh City to the town of Ben Tre—and from Greensboro, North Carolina, to Hackettstown, New Jersey—the photographer James Nachtwey went in search of the ecocide’s cruelest legacy, horribly deformed children in both Vietnam and America. Nachtwey, arguably the most celebrated war photographer of his generation, sees the former conflict in Southeast Asia as a touchstone for his work. “My decision to become a photographer,” he says, “was inspired by photographs from the Vietnam War.” This expanded photo essay from the land of Agent Orange makes clear, according to Nachtwey, that “the effects of war no longer end when the shooting stops.” [Photo Essay in Vanity Fair]
(via Vanity Fair) 

fotojournalismus:

Cam Lo, Quang Tri Province. Phan Thi Hoi bathes her 14-year-old son, Bui Quang Ky. She was exposed to Agent Orange when she was in the North Vietnamese Army during the war. Vietnam, 2004.  

[Credit : James Nachtwey

 In the 1960s, the United States blanketed the Mekong River delta with Agent Orange, a chemical defoliant more devastating than napalm. Thirty years after the end of the Vietnam War, the chemical is still poisoning the water and coursing through the blood of a third generation. From Ho Chi Minh City to the town of Ben Tre—and from Greensboro, North Carolina, to Hackettstown, New Jersey—the photographer James Nachtwey went in search of the ecocide’s cruelest legacy, horribly deformed children in both Vietnam and America. Nachtwey, arguably the most celebrated war photographer of his generation, sees the former conflict in Southeast Asia as a touchstone for his work. “My decision to become a photographer,” he says, “was inspired by photographs from the Vietnam War.” This expanded photo essay from the land of Agent Orange makes clear, according to Nachtwey, that “the effects of war no longer end when the shooting stops.” [Photo Essay in Vanity Fair]

(via Vanity Fair

#vietnam   #war   #history   #politics   #agent orange  
fotojournalismus:

A young girl warily eyes a guerrilla fighter in the Lubero district, where a rebel group meets with U.N. personnel, Congo, 2008.
[Credit : James Nachtwey]
[via]

fotojournalismus:

A young girl warily eyes a guerrilla fighter in the Lubero district, where a rebel group meets with U.N. personnel, Congo, 2008.

[Credit : James Nachtwey]

[via]

#congo   #war   #james nachtwey   #history  

picturesofwar:

This day in history:

Nguyen Van Lem, a member of the Vietcong, is executed in the streets of Saigon by South Vietnamese Police Chief General Nguyen Ngoc Loan, two days into the Tet Offensive.

The execution is caught on film by photojournalist Eddie Adams and becomes one of the most controversial and memorable moments of the Vietnam War.

February 1, 1968 - 44 years ago today.

(via fotojournalismus)

#vietnam   #vietnam war   #vietcong   #war   #history  
fotojournalismus:

Exodus From Libya
Photojournalist Chris de Bode has photographed an exodus, a line of people on the move from a place in which they could no longer stay to a destination unknown or even nonexistent. To cover the spectacle of the mass departure of Bangladeshi migrant workers from Libya, he took nearly 500 photos in a single day and found an artistic strategy that utilized the repetition and relentlessness that characterized his imagery of the human train. 
(via Foam Magazine) 
The Video of Libyan Exodus
Over the past five years or so, more and more still photographers are expanding their repertoires to include motion based work. This video, co-produced by Panos Picture Agency and photographer Chris de Bode is an example of a photographer making use of still images within the video format.
Chris de Bode:

 “I went on assignment for the Dutch Refugee Foundation, to the Libyan border in Tunisia and witnessed on the 4th of March an exodus of people fleeing the war in Libya. There were a lot of photographers working there. I wondered what I could add to all the pics made that day. I decided to stand still like a tripod shooting all people passing by and recorded the sound of the rolling wheels from suitcases, passing cars and footsteps. That same night I made a collage of 81 pictures which was published in various newspapers. I could do a small movie later. Later I realized that the whole event could be used as a metaphor for all people in the world fleeing violence, disaster etc….”

Here is the link of the video, check it out!
(via The Wall Street Journal)

fotojournalismus:

Exodus From Libya

Photojournalist Chris de Bode has photographed an exodus, a line of people on the move from a place in which they could no longer stay to a destination unknown or even nonexistent. To cover the spectacle of the mass departure of Bangladeshi migrant workers from Libya, he took nearly 500 photos in a single day and found an artistic strategy that utilized the repetition and relentlessness that characterized his imagery of the human train.

(via Foam Magazine)

The Video of Libyan Exodus

Over the past five years or so, more and more still photographers are expanding their repertoires to include motion based work. This video, co-produced by Panos Picture Agency and photographer Chris de Bode is an example of a photographer making use of still images within the video format.

Chris de Bode:

I went on assignment for the Dutch Refugee Foundation, to the Libyan border in Tunisia and witnessed on the 4th of March an exodus of people fleeing the war in Libya. There were a lot of photographers working there. I wondered what I could add to all the pics made that day. I decided to stand still like a tripod shooting all people passing by and recorded the sound of the rolling wheels from suitcases, passing cars and footsteps. That same night I made a collage of 81 pictures which was published in various newspapers. I could do a small movie later. Later I realized that the whole event could be used as a metaphor for all people in the world fleeing violence, disaster etc….

Here is the link of the video, check it out!

(via The Wall Street Journal)

#libya   #exodus   #africa   #history   #politics   #war  

fotojournalismus:

Reuters’ Iconic Images of the Iraq War

Nearly nine years after the invasion that toppled Saddam Hussein and with the U.S. military officially ending its war in Iraq, we take a look back at how Reuters photographers covered the conflict and captured defining images of the war. The mission cost nearly 4,500 American and well more than 100,000 Iraqi lives. The question of whether it was worth it all is yet unanswered.

(Previously on Fotojournalismus: Getty Images’ Most Memorable Photos From The Iraq War)

Photos : 

#1 : Alicia Casilio, dressed as an Iraqi civilian, stands silently at an anti-Iraq war protest in Boston, Massachusetts January 11, 2007. The numbers on Casilio’s face represent the estimated number of Iraqi civilians killed in the war. (Brian Snyder/Reuters)

#2 : An aerial view of the village of Kahtaniya, one of two villages struck by garbage trucks packed with explosives, west of Mosul, northwest of Baghdad August 16, 2007. Angry members of a minority sect said they feared annihilation and pleaded for help, after suicide attackers killed scores in possibly the worst such bomb attack of the Iraq conflict. (Thaier al-Sudani/Reuters)

#3 : An Iraqi baby lies in a cradle while a woman argues with U.S. soldiers of 1/8 Bravo Company searching for weapons, explosives and information about militants in the area during a foot patrol in a neighborhood of Mosul June 26, 2008. (Eduardo Munoz/Reuters)

#4 : A resident gestures as he talks to a U.S. soldier from 2nd Brigade combat team, 82nd Airborne on patrol in Baghdad’s Adhamiya district January 5, 2008. (Mahmoud Raouf Mahmoud/Reuters)

#5 : An Iraqi man sits against a mural based on the scandal of prisoners abuse in the prison of Abu Ghraib in the Shi’ites suburb of Sadr city in Baghdad May 27, 2004. (Ali Jasim/Reuters)

#6 : An Iraqi girl holds her hands up while U.S. and Iraqi soldiers search her family house in Baquba early June 30, 2007. (Goran Tomasevic/Reuters)

#7 : An Iraqi man suspected of having explosives in his car is held after being arrested by the U.S army near Baquba, Iraq, October 15, 2005. (Jorge Silva/Reuters)

#war   #iraq war   #war in iraq   #politics   #history   #reuters  
latimes:

As last U.S. troops exit Iraq, they leave a troubled land behind:  With little understanding of each other, Iraq and the U.S. collided in a long, brutal war that exacted a terrible price from both. They separate with very different understandings of what happened.
Photo credits: Times staff and wire photos

latimes:

As last U.S. troops exit Iraq, they leave a troubled land behind: With little understanding of each other, Iraq and the U.S. collided in a long, brutal war that exacted a terrible price from both. They separate with very different understandings of what happened.

Photo credits: Times staff and wire photos

(Source: Los Angeles Times, via mohandasgandhi)

#iraq war   #war   #war in iraq   #politics   #history   #usa   #military   #troops  
mohandasgandhi:

doctorswithoutborders:

The conflict that began two decades ago in Somalia continues, and its consequences are currently exacerbated by drought—one of the worst on record in the country. Thousands of people have been forced to flee Somalia, and are seeking humanitarian aid in refugee camps in Kenya and Ethiopia. A measles epidemic is spreading. The lack of infrastructure and services is worsening the population’s vulnerability. In recent weeks, civilians have endured new military offensives launched in southern Somalia and in the capital Mogadishu.
It is in this context that Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has, in less than six months, provided intensive medical care to more than 10,000 severely malnourished children who were brought to medical facilities. MSF has projects in northern Kenya, including in Dadaab; in eastern Ethiopia, in refugee camps in Malkadida, Kobe, Bokolmayo, Hilleweyn, Dolo Ado; and across much of south-central Somalia itself, in Marere, Beletwayne, Dinsor, Daynile, Mogadishu, Jowhar, Guriel, and Galcayo. MSF has also enrolled a total of 54,000 severely malnourished children in outpatient feeding programs in more than 30 locations in these three countries.
At the same time, MSF teams have been battling the deadly combination of measles and acute malnutrition, which affects children in particular. Read morePhoto: Somalia 2011 © Yann Libessart/MSF

You can also donate to Doctors Without Borders. Over half a million children in the horn of Africa are at risk of dying from starvation due to this drought.

mohandasgandhi:

doctorswithoutborders:

The conflict that began two decades ago in Somalia continues, and its consequences are currently exacerbated by drought—one of the worst on record in the country. Thousands of people have been forced to flee Somalia, and are seeking humanitarian aid in refugee camps in Kenya and Ethiopia. A measles epidemic is spreading. The lack of infrastructure and services is worsening the population’s vulnerability. In recent weeks, civilians have endured new military offensives launched in southern Somalia and in the capital Mogadishu.

It is in this context that Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has, in less than six months, provided intensive medical care to more than 10,000 severely malnourished children who were brought to medical facilities. MSF has projects in northern Kenya, including in Dadaab; in eastern Ethiopia, in refugee camps in Malkadida, Kobe, Bokolmayo, Hilleweyn, Dolo Ado; and across much of south-central Somalia itself, in Marere, Beletwayne, Dinsor, Daynile, Mogadishu, Jowhar, Guriel, and Galcayo. MSF has also enrolled a total of 54,000 severely malnourished children in outpatient feeding programs in more than 30 locations in these three countries.

At the same time, MSF teams have been battling the deadly combination of measles and acute malnutrition, which affects children in particular. Read more

Photo: Somalia 2011 © Yann Libessart/MSF

You can also donate to Doctors Without Borders. Over half a million children in the horn of Africa are at risk of dying from starvation due to this drought.

#somalia   #africa   #horn of africa   #humanitarian crisis   #famine   #war  
watanafghanistan:

A mother holds an opium-filled joint to her daughter’s lips in their home in Kabul, Afghanistan, August 2009. The side effects of poverty, war and hardships most of Afghan women go through. Usually mothers tend to keep their children quiet as they work by giving them opium.

watanafghanistan:

A mother holds an opium-filled joint to her daughter’s lips in their home in Kabul, Afghanistan, August 2009. The side effects of poverty, war and hardships most of Afghan women go through. Usually mothers tend to keep their children quiet as they work by giving them opium.

(via galdikas-deactivated20121116)

#afghanistan   #opium   #family   #war  
mohandasgandhi:

All quiet on the Western Front as haunting images of the Great War’s battlefields are revealed before Remembrance Day
Ruins: The remains of the Chateau de Soupir after the village in  northern France was cleared by elite British unit the Brigade of Guards  on the 14th September 1914
Check out the rest of this amazing gallery.

mohandasgandhi:

All quiet on the Western Front as haunting images of the Great War’s battlefields are revealed before Remembrance Day

Ruins: The remains of the Chateau de Soupir after the village in northern France was cleared by elite British unit the Brigade of Guards on the 14th September 1914

Check out the rest of this amazing gallery.

#remembrance day   #veterans   #world war   #war   #history  
fyeahblackhistory:

paxamericana:

The 21st century African land rush

If you don’t understand that the new scramble for Africa is underway, it’s probably because you never studied the history of the first scramble.

fyeahblackhistory:

paxamericana:

The 21st century African land rush

If you don’t understand that the new scramble for Africa is underway, it’s probably because you never studied the history of the first scramble.

(via caraobrien)

#africa   #history   #economy   #politics   #continent   #war  
You killed my son and now you are giving me a tree?
An Iraqi farmer to Peter Van Buren of the US State Department after his team tried to give away fruit tree seedlings to replant ruined orchards  (x)

(Source: The New York Times, via dael-io-lantern)

#quote   #iraq   #war  
doctorswithoutborders:

Poverty, lack of access to food and healthcare, underpin malnutrition in the North Kivu province of the Democratic Republic of Congo. And the war, often referred to as “The Forgotten War”, makes the situation only that much worse. In the Starved for Attention film “The Malnutrition That Shouldn’t Be,” photojournalist Franco Pagetti reveals the daily struggle to survive in North Kivu’s forbidding bush and teeming, fetid displaced persons camps, where food is scarce and the people are on edge, ready to run at a moment’s notice.
This is one of 195 million stories of malnutrition. Sign the petition to help us rewrite the story.
Photo: Democratic Republic of Congo 2009 © Franco Pagetti/VII

doctorswithoutborders:

Poverty, lack of access to food and healthcare, underpin malnutrition
in the North Kivu province of the Democratic Republic of Congo. And the war, often referred to as “The Forgotten War”, makes the situation only that much worse. In the Starved for Attention film “The Malnutrition That Shouldn’t Be,” photojournalist Franco Pagetti reveals the daily struggle to survive in North Kivu’s forbidding bush and teeming, fetid displaced persons camps, where food is scarce and the people are on edge, ready to run at a moment’s notice.

This is one of 195 million stories of malnutrition. Sign the petition to help us rewrite the story.

Photo: Democratic Republic of Congo 2009 © Franco Pagetti/VII

(via crookedindifference)

canisfamiliaris:

The hard truth.
Worse, both the war and the poverty are unnecessary.
(via wearethe99percent :: from OccupySF)

canisfamiliaris:

The hard truth.

Worse, both the war and the poverty are unnecessary.

(via wearethe99percent :: from OccupySF)

#war   #poverty   #money   #economics   #politics   #america   #usa